Effective August 28, 2020, with the Governor’s recent signing of HB 2046, the fee collected for each death certificate will increase by $1.00 to $14.00 for the first certified copy. The fee for each additional certified copy, ordered at the same time, will also increase by $1.00 to $11.00.


Vital records in Missouri can be corrected or amended in specific instances in accordance with state statutes and regulations with the proper documentary evidence and/or legal documents. Some of these changes can be performed with a correction affidavit and applicable documentation, while some changes or amendments require a court order.

For more information about requesting a correction or amendment to a Missouri vital record, contact the Bureau of Vital Records at 573-751-6387, option 2.

Correction or amendment services include, but are not limited to:

Adoptions

Domestic Adoptions

In Missouri, in accordance with RSMo 453.100, after the completion of an adoption and entry of the Certificate Decree of Adoption, the clerk of the court shall immediately send to the Department of Health and Senior Services, Bureau of Vital Records, a certificate of the decree of adoption, which shall set forth the original name, the new name, sex, date, and place of birth of the person adopted, the name of his natural parents, if known, the names of the adopting parents, and any other pertinent facts set forth in the decree of adoption.

Fees: $15.00 to process court order. Additional $15.00 for copy of new birth certificate. Make check or money order payable to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.

Foreign Born Adoptions

Foreign born children adopted by Missouri residents can have a new birth certificate created for their child in one of two processes:

  1. Adoptive parents or applicable attorney can submit all required foreign born documents to the bureau, in which those documents become a permanent part of the record and a new foreign born Missouri birth certificate is created. This certificate does not serve as proof of citizenship.
  2. The proof of adoption required by the Department shall include:

    • a copy of the original birth certificate and adoption decree
    • an English translation of such birth certificate and adoption decree; the authenticity of the translation of the birth certificate and adoption decree required shall be sworn to by the translator in a notarized document
    • a copy of the approval of the immigration of the adopted person by the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the United States government which shows the child lawfully entered the United States
  1. Foreign born adoption recognized by a Missouri court of competent jurisdiction and then that court will forward the Certificate Decree of Adoption to vital records. This results in the creation of a traditional Missouri birth certificate.

Fees: $15.00 to process foreign born paperwork/court order. Additional $15.00 for copy of new birth certificate. Make check or money order payable to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.

Correction Affidavits

Correction affidavits are notarized legal documents used to correct errors contained in registered vital records. Per 19 CSR 10-10, only specific individuals are authorized to make changes to vital records. Also, correction affidavits often require established supporting documentation. An established supporting document is one in which permanently maintained by an agency, organization, or business and is accessible for verification at a later date.

Court Orders

Court orders are official rulings or judgements issued by a judge. Court orders pertaining to vital records can range from multiple topics including, but not limited to, establishing a birth, establishing a presumptive death, and correcting a vital record. When a correction affidavit cannot be utilized to correct a vital record, per 19 CSR 10-10, a certified court order from a court of competent jurisdiction will be necessary. The order shall identify the record(s) as presently filed and direct the bureau as to the items to be corrected.

Legitimations

If the mother marries the natural father after the birth of their child, a new legitimated birth certificate can be created. Both parents must complete affidavits to legitimate the birth record. Each affidavit must be notarized. A certified copy of the parents’ marriage license of marriage certification must be submitted along with the affidavits. Upon receipt of the completed notarized affidavits and certified copy of marriage license or certification, the Bureau of Vital Records will create a new certificate and the previous certificate will be sealed.

Submit the following:

  • A notarized father’s affidavit to legitimate birth record completed and signed by the father of the child.
  • A notarized mother’s affidavit to legitimate birth record completed and signed by the mother of the child.
  • A certified copy of the marriage license or marriage certification.
  • A $15.00 processing fee is required to legitimate a birth record and certified copies of the newly legitimated certificates are $15.00 each.

If mother is deceased, a notarized affidavit is required from one (1) of the mother’s parents or her brother or sister stating that s/he believes the man to be the father of the child based on an oral or written statement of the man. A certified copy of the mother’s death certificate is also required.

If alleged father is deceased, a notarized affidavit is required from one (1) of the alleged father’s parents or his brother or sister stating that s/he believes him to be the father of the child based on an oral or written statement of the man. A certified copy of the father’s death certificate is also required.

A certified copy of the marriage license or marriage certification may be obtained from the Recorder of Deeds in the county where the license was obtained. The certified copy will become part of the sealed file and cannot be returned.

Note: If the mother has been previously married, a certified copy of each marriage license or marriage certification must be furnished.

Return the above referenced forms, your check or money order, and a legal sized, self-addressed stamped envelope to:

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
Bureau of Vital Records
930 Wildwood Drive
Jefferson City, Missouri 65109

Paternity Affidavits

The Affidavit Acknowledging Paternity is a legal document. Read the information provided below before completing an Affidavit. Following are the alternatives to completing the Affidavit and your legal rights and responsibilities.

Before you complete an Affidavit Acknowledging Paternity, you must receive oral (spoken) notice of the below information. If you are completing the Affidavit at the hospital when your child is born, you may receive oral notice from hospital staff. If you are completing the affidavit after the birth certificate has been filed, you may receive oral notice from the agency that gave you the form.

You may also receive oral notice by calling (toll free) 1-888-677-2083.

  • When both parents properly complete and sign an Affidavit Acknowledging Paternity, the man’s name is added to the childʼs birth certificate, and the man becomes the legal father of the child. Properly completed affidavits have the same effect as a court order establishing paternity and can be used as a basis for entering a child support order.
  • If either of you is not sure that this man is the biological (natural) father of this child, you should not sign an Affidavit Acknowledging Paternity. You should have a genetic test. If the test shows at least a 98 percent probability that the man is the father, then Missouri law says he is the presumed father. A genetic test can be provided by the Family Support Division (FSD). Either of you may apply for this service by calling FSD at 1-800-859-7999. If the genetic test shows that the man is the childʼs biological father, you may then sign an Affidavit Acknowledging Paternity.
  • If either of you change your mind about acknowledging paternity after you have signed the Affidavit, you may sign a rescission form and file it with the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services - Bureau of Vital Records (BVR) within the earlier of: 60 days from the date of the last signature on the Affidavits; or the date of a proceeding to establish child support for the child on the Affidavits. When the rescission is filed, the man will no longer be the legal father; however, his name will stay on the birth certificate unless a court order tells BVR to remove his name.
  • If it is more than 60 days after both of you sign the Affidavits or after the date of a child support proceeding, and you decide you want to prove this man is not the father, you must go to court. You must prove there was fraud, duress, or material mistake of fact when you signed the Affidavit.
  • This child may have the right to receive benefits as the legal child of the man who signs an Affidavit Acknowledging Paternity. These benefits may include child support, medical insurance, inheritance rights, Social Security, and Veteranʼs benefits.
  • Acknowledging paternity does not automatically give the father visitation or custody rights. Seek legal advice regarding custody and visitation rights, or any other related legal matters.

Persons who knowingly supply false information on the Affidavit Acknowledging Paternity shall be guilty of a class E felony. Penalties under the criminal code include imprisonment up to 4 years and/or up to $10,000 in fines.

What is a rescission form?
The Rescission of Affidavit Acknowledging Paternity is used to rescind the legal finding of paternity created by a previously completed Affidavit Acknowledging Paternity. It must be filed with BVR within:

  • 60 days from the date of the last signature of the Affidavit Acknowledging Paternity or
  • The date of a proceeding to establish child support for the child on the Affidavit Acknowledging Paternity

This form may be completed only by the mother or alleged father in the presence of a notary public or two adult witnesses who are not related to either parent.

The rescission form does not remove father’s information from birth record. The only way a father’s name can be removed from a registered certificate is by a court order.

Putative Father Registry

The putative father registry allows a man to “officially” claim he is the father of a child. A man may want to do this before paternity is legally established if he cannot find the child’s mother or if the mother does not want to establish paternity for the child. The Putative Father Registry is used in adoption proceedings to identify the child’s father and promptly secure his consent to proceed with the adoption.

How can the father be placed on the Registry?
The father can be placed on the registry by a Notice of Intent form, Acknowledgment of Paternity Affidavit, or by court order. The Notice of Intent must be filed prior to the birth or within 15 days of the child’s birth in order to be notified of an adoption proceeding for the child.

Failure to file in a timely manner shall waive a man’s right to withhold consent to an adoption proceeding unless:

  • The person was led to believe through the mother’s misrepresentation or fraud that:
  • The mother was not pregnant when in fact she was; or
  • The pregnancy was terminated when in fact the baby was born; or,
  • After the birth, the child died when in fact the child is alive; and,

The person upon the discovery of the misrepresentation or fraud satisfied the requirements within 15 days of that discovery.

Who can request a search of the Putative Father Registry?
A mother, father, court, caseworker, licensed child placing agency, or an intermediary such as attorney, physician, and clergyman, if representing the parents, can request a search of the putative father registry. A search can also be made by other family members if it is through the request of their attorney.

Surrogacies

Surrogacies are a method of assisted reproduction in which intended parents work, usually by contract, with a gestational surrogate who carries and cares for their baby until birth. The Bureau of Vital Records accepts post-birth court orders. The certified court order from a court of competent jurisdiction must list appropriate identifying information and include the listed parties, medical certifier, medical procedure performed.

A $15.00 processing fee is required to process a surrogacy court order and certified copies of birth certificates are $15.00 each.