Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services HEALTH AND SAFETY http://health.mo.gov/information/news/rss.xml Official news releases issued by the Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services. en-us <![CDATA[ Hospital in Sweet Springs voluntarily suspends license]]>Media Contact:
Lisa Cox
Chief, Office of Public Information
Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
Lisa.Cox@health.mo.gov

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) is alerting the public of regulatory issues with I-70 Community Hospital located at 105 Hospital Drive in Sweet Springs, Missouri.  I-70 Community Hospital is currently out of regulatory compliance and unable to provide hospital services to the fullest extent.  Effective today at 7 p.m., the hospital is voluntarily suspending their license for 90 days as they work toward regaining full compliance and meeting its regulatory requirements.

"While access to health care is important, safety of patients has to be the top priority," said Dr. Randall Williams, DHSS Director. "The hospital's action today supports our commitment to keep people safe."

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo.

 

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Fri, 15 Feb 2019 23:23:13 CST
<![CDATA[ Missouri's Child and Adult Care Food Program is available to many facilities]]>Contact:
Lisa Cox
Chief, Office of Public Information
Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
Lisa.Cox@health.mo.gov

JEFFERSON CITY, MO - Missouri's Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS), Bureau of Community Food and Nutrition Assistance (CFNA) is seeking eligible child and adult care facilities, afterschool programs and emergency shelters to participate in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP).  The CACFP is a federally-funded U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrition program available to child care centers, adult day care centers, Head Start programs, emergency shelters and before and afterschool programs.  The program reimburses approved facilities for nutritious meals and snacks served to children and adults in care.  The meals are available to children and adult program participants at no separate charge.

Federal income guidelines determine children's eligibility for free and reduced-price meals through the CACFP.  Foster children and children who receive benefits through Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR), or who are Head Start participants are categorically eligible to receive free meals through the CACFP.  Adults who receive SNAP benefits, FDPIR benefits, Social Security Income (SSI), or are Medicaid participants are automatically eligible for free meals.

Approved or exempt institutions that offer a structured afterschool program with educational or enrichment activities may be eligible to participate in the At-Risk Afterschool component of the CACFP.  This program reimburses institutions that serve nutritious afterschool snacks and/or a supper meal to children up to 18 years of age in a structured environment after the school day has ended.  The afterschool program must be located in a low-income area where 50 percent or more of the children at the nearest school receive free or reduced-price meals.

To learn more about participating in the CACFP, visit the CACFP webpage, call 800-733-6251 or email CACFP@health.mo.gov

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.) should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1)            mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
                Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
                1400 Independence Avenue, SW
                Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

(2)            fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3)            email: program.intake@usda.gov.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo.

 

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Fri, 08 Feb 2019 21:20:54 CST
<![CDATA[ DHSS collects feedback on rulemaking process for medical marijuana program]]>

Contact:
Lisa Cox
Chief, Office of Public Information
Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
Lisa.Cox@health.mo.gov

JEFFERSON CITY, MO – The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) is in the process of forming rules for the state’s medical marijuana program which the department recently began to implement.

DHSS’s Section for Medical Marijuana Regulation will host a forum from 6-9 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 13 at the Governor’s Office Building, Room 450, to accept suggestions from the public regarding the formation of rules and regulations for the program.

“We are currently establishing program rules in accordance with the Constitution, and we feel it is essential that we gather input from Missourians as part of this process,” said Lyndall Fraker, Director, DHSS Section of Medical Marijuana Regulation. 

The forum will be an opportunity for interested individuals to leave thoughtful feedback, verbally or written, about what should and should not be included in the medical marijuana program regulations.

While this forum is open to the public, the scope of the discussion will be limited to suggestions for program regulation.

As part of its effort to gather all relevant input, DHSS has also established a page on the medical marijuana program website where it will begin releasing initial drafts of its rules for public review. In the coming months, interested individuals should monitor this page for new drafts, which will be posted as soon as they are available. Suggestions for these initial drafts may be submitted in writing through the Suggestion Form on that page or by emailing MedicalMarijuanaInfo@health.mo.gov.

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo.

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Wed, 06 Feb 2019 20:23:00 CST
<![CDATA[ License offices awarded for their efforts to save and enhance lives]]>Contact:
Lisa Cox
Chief, Office of Public Information
Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
Lisa.Cox@health.mo.gov

JEFFERSON CITY, MO - The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS), along with the Governor's Organ Donation Advisory Committee and their partners are pleased to recognize 12 top performing local license offices for their efforts to register individuals and collect contributions to support the Donor Registry System and education efforts.

"Every day the license office clerks show their commitment to saving and enhancing lives by asking every patron if they want to be an organ, eye and tissue donor," said Dr. Randall Williams, DHSS Director. "We encourage everyone to be an organ donor and let your family know of your decision to give the gift of life."

Local license offices are responsible for over 97 percent of the 3.8 million registered Missouri organ donors.

The offices with the highest percent of registrations and contribution collections per transaction receive recognition in the form of a certificate and mention in the Program's annual report. Awards are calculated on a quarterly basis throughout the state fiscal year.

Congratulations to the following FY19 first quarter awardees.

Registrations - All Offices

  1. Liberty, 65.1%
  2. Columbia South, 65.0%
  3. Parkville, 64.6%
  4. Des Peres, 64.0%
  5. Belton, 63.5%

Registrations - Transaction Based

  1. Offices with 3,000 or fewer transactions in FY18 - Monticello, 59.1%
  2. Offices with 3,001-9,100 transactions in FY18 - Pacific, 62.8%
  3. Offices 9,101 or more transactions in FY18 - Liberty, 65.1%

Contributions - All Offices

  1. Pacific, 29.8%
  2. Montgomery City, 29.1%
  3. Hartville, 26.5%
  4. Lamar, 26.2%
  5. Imperial, 25.8%

Contributions - Transaction Based

  1. Offices with 3,000 or fewer transactions in FY18 - Montgomery City, 29.1%
  2. Offices with 3,001-9,100 transactions in FY18 - Pacific, 29.8%
  3. Offices 9,101 or more transactions in FY18 - Imperial, 25.8%

To learn more about organ, eye and tissue donation or to register your decision to become a donor visit www.health.mo.gov/living/organdonor.

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo.

 

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Mon, 04 Feb 2019 09:41:53 CST
<![CDATA[ Missouri WIC operations and services remain uninterrupted]]>Contact:
Lisa Cox
Office of Public Information
Lisa.Cox@health.mo.gov

JEFFERSON CITY, MO - The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, known as WIC, remains in operation in Missouri. Missouri WIC local agencies will continue to hold appointments with participants and will provide the same level of services and benefits. Missouri WIC has received funding to support normal program operations through at least March 31, 2019. WIC local agencies will continue normal operations at the same level. In addition, the WIC state agency has notified local agencies and retailers that the program will allow all benefits issued to participants to be redeemed for the months printed on the WIC checks. Some participants are on tri-monthly benefit issuance; therefore, during the month of March, benefits will be issued to some participants for April, May and June.

The partial government shutdown, and lack of an approved federal budget for the USDA, has interrupted the normal flow of funding and information from USDA to WIC state agencies. The WIC state agency is participating in regular calls with USDA to remain apprised of developments at the federal level. USDA has been issuing funding needs surveys and is working diligently with individual state agencies to avoid interruptions to WIC benefits and services.

The state agency plans to issue another programmatic update by February 28, 2019 regarding funding and further continuation of program operations.

Pregnant women, new mothers, and families with children from birth through their fifth birthday can learn more about qualifying and enrolling in the Missouri WIC program by visiting the Missouri WIC website at wic.mo.gov to locate their local agency or by calling 1-800-TEL-LINK (1-800-835-5465).

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo.

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Fri, 01 Feb 2019 20:13:26 CST
<![CDATA[ State seeking organizations to serve meals to children during summer months]]>Federally funded program helps fight childhood hunger

Contact:
Lisa Cox, Chief
Office of Public Information
Lisa.Cox@health.mo.gov

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) is looking for organizations throughout the state to help feed thousands of children who would otherwise go without meals during the summer months when school is not in session.

The Summer Food Service Program reimburses organizations for meals they serve to children who are at risk of not having enough to eat. The program is one of the ways Missouri is working to fight childhood hunger.

"Preventing food insecurity in children is an important step in improving the health of Missourians," said Dr. Randall Williams, DHSS director. "Without the assistance of organizations across the state, many of Missouri's children would go hungry during the summer months. Thank you to all the organizations who have participated in the past, and thank you to any organization considering participating this summer. DHSS would be happy to answer any questions an organization may have as they consider participating in this program."

The summer food program provides nutritious meals to children under age 18 during the summer months when school breakfast and lunch programs are not operating.

Organizations eligible to participate in the program include schools, faith-based organizations, camps, private nonprofit agencies, and local government entities. The sites are required to be located in areas where at least half of the children are eligible to receive free or reduced-price meals.

The federally funded program is administered by DHSS. The department will accept applications
March 1 through May 15 to participate in the program. Organizations interested in becoming sponsors are required to attend training.

More information about the Summer Food Service Program is available online at www.health.mo.gov/sfsp or by telephone at 888-435-1464 (toll-free). Hearing-and speech- impaired citizens can dial 711. Potential sponsors may also write to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Summer Food Service Program, P.O. Box 570, Jefferson City, MO 65102.

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo.

In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at: http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_filing_cust.html and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

(1)         mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights

1400 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

(2)         fax: (202) 690-7442; or

(3)         email: program.intake@usda.gov

 

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

 

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Fri, 01 Feb 2019 16:51:28 CST
<![CDATA[ State health department advises Missourians to take precautions against bitter cold temperatures]]>Missourians are urged to check on neighbors, the elderly and disabled citizens

For Immediate Release:
January 18, 2019

Contact:
Lisa Cox
Office of Public Information
Lisa.Cox@health.mo.gov

 

JEFFERSON CITY, MO – Bitterly cold temperatures and dangerously cold wind chills are forecasted for this weekend and next week. The National Weather Service is predicting temperatures getting as low as the single digits and wind chills well below zero degrees. The coldest temperatures are expected to be Saturday through Monday with the coldest periods expected during the early hours of those days.

 

“We greatly appreciate the incredible dedication of our colleagues at the Department of Transportation and the Department of Public Safety this past weekend, under Director McKenna and Director Karsten’s leadership, as they kept us safe on the roadways.” said Dr. Randall Williams, Director of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS). “As we approach this weekend, we also want to emphasize that the forecasted conditions will be much colder than what we have experienced so far this season, and prolonged exposure can lead to hypothermia. Also, the combination of precipitation and these extreme temperatures is expected to cause slick surfaces. We urge all to take caution to avoid falls.”

 

DHSS urges residents to minimize outdoor activities during the extreme cold and to follow these safety tips:

 

  • Stay indoors in a warm area. If heat is not available, a warming center near you can be located at https://ogi.oa.mo.gov/DHSS/warmingCenter/index.html or you can obtain these resources by dialing 2-1-1 for United Way Referral.

  • Check on your neighbors, especially senior citizens and disabled adults. Make sure they are using adequate and safe heating sources. The state’s toll-free, adult abuse and neglect hotline (1-800-392-0210) can be used to report any elderly persons or adults with disabilities who may be suffering from extreme cold temperatures and need assistance. This hotline is operated 365 days per year from 7 a.m. to 12 a.m.

  • If you do have to be outdoors, dress in several layers of loose-fitting, layered and lightweight clothing. The space between these layers works as insulation to help keep you warmer.

    • Wear water resistant boots and something on your head.

    • Protect your ears and face. Wear a scarf to help protect your lungs from cold air – it will also protect your ears and face.

    • Schedule outdoor activities during the warmest part of the day, usually 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

    • Carry extra clothes with you such as socks, gloves, hats and jackets so you can change them if they get wet.

  • Watch for signs of frostbite and hypothermia.

    • Frostbite causes a loss of feeling and pale or waxy white appearance of extremities, such as fingers, toes, ear lobes or the tip of the nose.  Other signs may include numbness, a tingling or stinging sensation in the affected body part and reduced blood flow. If any of these symptoms are detected, please seek medical help immediately.

    • The warning signs of hypothermia include uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, slurred speech, drowsiness and apparent exhaustion. In infants, the skin will turn bright red and cold, and they may present with a very low energy level. If any of these signs appear, get the victim to a warm location immediately and call 911 for immediate medical assistance. 

  • Increase your fluid intake - regardless of your activity level. Don’t wait until you feel thirsty to drink fluids. Avoid alcohol.

    • Ensure infants and children drink adequate amounts of liquids.

  • Medications can also increase the risk of temperature related illnesses. Some of these medications include antidepressants, antihistamines, heart medications, diuretics and chemotherapy drugs. Always consult with your doctor regarding the medications you are taking.

  • Make sure your car is properly winterized. Keep your gas tank filled. Prepare an emergency kit including blankets, a flashlight, waterproof matches, non-perishable foods and water.

  • Ensure you have sufficient heating fuel, as well as alternative emergency heating equipment in case you lose electricity. When using alternative heat sources, such as a generator, a fireplace, wood stove or space heater, take necessary safety precautions:

    • Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas that can cause flu-like illness or death. Carbon monoxide poisoning can happen during extremely cold weather when individuals try warming their homes through unconventional methods.

    • Never heat your home by using a gas stove, oven, kerosene heater, or charcoal or propane barbecue grill.

    • Make sure all heating devices are properly ventilated, and always operate a generator outdoors and at least 20 feet away from any window, door or vent in your home. Improper heating devices can lead to dangerous carbon monoxide buildup in the home.

    • Test your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors.

    • Keep a fire extinguisher handy and ensure everyone knows how to use it properly.

    • Place anything that can burn easily at least three feet away from space heaters.

    • Do NOT run a car or truck inside a garage that is attached to your house, even if the door is open.

    • If you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning, call 911 immediately and get the victim to fresh air.

  • Limit outdoor time for your pets. They are also susceptible to the extreme cold temperatures.

 

For additional information regarding extreme cold safety tips, visit http://health.mo.gov/living/healthcondiseases/hypothermia/index.php or contact your local health department.

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo.

 

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Fri, 18 Jan 2019 15:01:49 CST
<![CDATA[ CDC awards Missouri public water systems for fluoridation quality]]>


For Immediate Release:
January 16, 2019

Contact:
Lisa Cox
Office of Public Information
MediaInfo@health.mo.gov


JEFFERSON CITY, MO – The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services has announced that 13 public water systems in Missouri have been awarded a Water Fluoridation Quality Award from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Fluoridation is the adjustment of fluoride in drinking water to a level that is effective for preventing tooth decay. The award recognizes those communities that achieved excellence in community water fluoridation by maintaining a consistent level of fluoride in drinking water throughout 2017. Those communities are as follows:

  • Branson, Missouri
  • Cameron, Missouri
  • Cole County PWSD #4-Jefferson City, Missouri
  • Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri
  • Jackson, Missouri
  • Jefferson City, Missouri
  • Kahoka, Missouri
  • Perryville, Missouri
  • Poplar Bluff, Missouri
  • Portageville, Missouri
  • Salisbury, Missouri
  • Slater, Missouri
  • Unionville, Missouri

For 2017, a total of 1,499 public water systems in 30 states received these awards, including those in Missouri. 

“Water fluoridation is one of the best investments that a community can make in maintaining the oral health of its citizens,” stated Casey Hannan, MPH, Acting Director of the Division of Oral Health in the CDC. “It is equally as effective in preventing cavities in children and adults.”

Fluoridation is highly cost-effective. Studies continue to show that for each dollar invested in water fluoridation, the community saves $38 in dental treatment costs.

Community water fluoridation has been recognized by CDC as one of 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century. CDC recommends water fluoridation as one of the most practical, cost-effective, equitable and safe measures a community can take to prevent tooth decay and improve oral health overall.

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo.

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Fri, 14 Dec 2018 14:10:40 CST
<![CDATA[ DHSS begins rulemaking process for medical marijuana program]]>

Contact:
Lisa Cox
Office of Public Information
MediaInfo@health.mo.gov

 

JEFFERSON CITY, MO - Following the majority of Missourians' November 2018 vote to adopt Constitutional Amendment 2, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) began accepting pre-filed license application fees for medical marijuana facilities on Jan. 7 and is now in the process of forming rules for the program.

DHSS has accepted more than 250 forms and over $2 million in application fees this week.

The department is currently on schedule to establish program rules in order to efficiently regulate and control the cultivation, manufacturing and sale of marijuana for medical use.

"We have a responsibility as public servants of Missouri to implement this process for qualified patients according to the Constitution, and we are pleased that the initial phase has been executed on schedule and with great success thanks to the tireless work of an adaptable staff," said Dr. Randall Williams, DHSS Director.  

As part of its effort to gather all relevant input, DHSS has established a new page on its medical marijuana program website where it will begin releasing initial drafts of its rules for public review. In the coming months, interested individuals should monitor www.health.mo.gov/safety/medical-marijuana/index.php for new drafts, which will be posted as soon as they are available. Suggestions for these initial drafts may be submitted through the Suggestion Form on that page.

The collection of non-refundable pre-filed license application fees is ongoing, and early submission of application fees does not guarantee a license or provide any competitive advantage in the application process. Official application forms will be available no later than June 4, 2019.

Application fee payments may be made by personal or certified check, cashier's check or money orders made payable to Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.  Cash will not be accepted.  Any application fee must be accompanied by a completed Pre-Filed Application Fee Form available at https://health.mo.gov/safety/medical-marijuana/index.php.

Payment and the Pre-Filed Application Fee Form may be mailed to:

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
FEE RECEIPT UNIT
P.O. Box 570, Jefferson City, MO 65102-0570

Or personally delivered during business hours to:

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services
920 Wildwood Drive
Jefferson City, MO 65109

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo.

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Thu, 10 Jan 2019 22:04:28 CST
<![CDATA[ Increasing efforts to reduce maternal mortality in Missouri]]>JEFFERSON CITY, MO -In an effort to decrease the number of maternal deaths in the state, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has partnered with many other state agencies and external stakeholders to implement new measures focused on improving Missouri's national ranking. Missouri is ranked 42nd in the United States for maternal mortality.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) have expanded the definition of maternal death from the death of a "woman while pregnant or within 42 days" to include "women while pregnant or within one year of the termination of pregnancy."

"We have many wonderful people working to improve healthcare for mothers and babies in Missouri, but they need our help," said Dr. Randall Williams, Department of Health and Senior Services Director. "The State of Missouri has begun the process of implementing three new initiatives under Governor Parson's leadership that I believe will help save moms and their babies' lives." 

As part of the Governor's health care week, one week ago Governor Parson, Department of Social Services Director Steve Corsi, Department of Mental Health Director Mark Stringer and Williams met with key stakeholders at Truman Medical Center to host a roundtable to discuss infant and maternal mortality, and what can be done to reduce the rate of maternal deaths.

"Nearly half of all babies born in Kansas City, Missouri are delivered at Truman Medical Centers," said Devika Maulik, MD, Maternal and Fetal Medicine, roundtable participant. "Knowing that Governor Parson and his team are putting maternal and infant health on the list of Missouri's top priorities means a great deal to the physicians and medical staff who live it every day, and are equally passionate about ensuring the health and welfare of mothers in Missouri along with our state's newest residents."

One of the major changes is Missouri's Pregnancy-Associated Mortality Review (PAMR) Committee will now review the most current data available rather than look back at data from years ago. This reflects the new focus of the committee to review data and make recommendations in real time to try and prevent maternal deaths based on the most recent data.  The Committee has increased its membership and will heighten its study of deaths that occur in hospitals as well as those that occur during the first year after delivery.

DHSS, in partnership with Missouri Hospital Association (MHA) and MO HealthNet, will be applying to join the Alliance for Innovation on Maternal Health (AIM), a national data-driven maternal safety and quality improvement initiative based on proven implementation approaches to improving maternal safety and outcomes in the United States, with an end goal to eliminate preventable maternal mortality and severe morbidity across the country. In addition, MHA will facilitate in implementing patient safety bundles in hospitals statewide to improve safety in maternity care. These safety rulings consist of guidelines to focus on common causes of maternal deaths such as bleeding or pulmonary embolus.

DHSS will also be working with partners to create and implement a perinatal quality collaborative (PQC), which are state networks of teams working to improve the quality of care for mothers and babies. Nationwide, PQCs have contributed to important improvements in health care and outcomes for mothers and babies, including: reductions in deliveries before 39 weeks of pregnancy without a medical reason, reductions in healthcare-associated bloodstream infections in newborns, and reductions in severe pregnancy complications.

DHSS has collaborated with the Office of Administration (OA) Information Technology Services Division (ITSD) and has installed the Maternal Mortality Review Information Application (MMRIA), a standardized data-collection and analysis tool developed by CDC to support essential review functions. The successful implementation of the application in the State Data Center, with guidance from the Office of Cyber Security in OA and the CDC, provides DHSS a technical solution and the ongoing technical support for data collection, review and security.

Another partner to state agencies is the Show-ME ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) program, which provides training and telemedicine for Missouri providers and patients in various, more specialized topics.

"The state funded Show-Me ECHO program is kicking off two ECHO's focusing on High Risk OB in both rural and urban areas in February 2019," said Gwen Ratermann, Associate Director of Outreach with the Missouri Telehealth Network, Show-Me ECHO. "Both programs will strive to improve maternal and infant care and outcomes by empowering teams utilizing evidence-based practices informed by the social determinants of health."

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo.

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Thu, 20 Dec 2018 22:53:16 CST
<![CDATA[ Bridgeton Health Consultation: Public Meeting with Availability Session and Extension of Public Comment Period]]>New date for the public meeting is Jan. 7, 2019

JEFFERSON CITY, MO - The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) is hosting a meeting on Jan. 7, 2019 for the public to submit comments in regards to the release of the public comment version of the Bridgeton Public Health Consultation. This meeting was originally scheduled on Nov. 15 but was rescheduled due to inclement weather.

The DHSS Jan. 7 public meeting will be held at the Bridgeton Banquet Center, 12259 Natural Bridge Road, Bridgeton, MO 63044. The meeting will begin with a come-and-go format availability session from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. A formal presentation lasting about 30 minutes will follow at 6:30 p.m. followed by community comments until closing at 8:30 p.m.

Bridgeton Landfill is a solid waste landfill located within the boundaries of the West Lake Landfill in the Greater St. Louis metropolitan area. Sub-surface smoldering at the landfill resulted in increased gas and odor emissions from the landfill. DHSS evaluated air data collected near Bridgeton Landfill in Bridgeton, MO, to determine the potential impacts of landfill gas emissions on people's health. The evaluated air data were collected by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from 2013 to 2016. Today, the data show that chemical and odor detections have been substantially reduced.

"There is a tremendous amount of data and scientific review that has gone into this report. Our primary goal in reviewing and reporting on the data in this report, and in the bi-weekly messages we have issued since 2013, has always been to provide clear, actionable information to the community," said Jonathan Garoutte, Administrator of the DHSS Section for Environmental Public Health. "Getting direct feedback from the community helps ensure that our messages are clear. We believe that the public health consultation, and the science behind it, distinctly shows a positive improvement in the air quality around the landfill."

DHSS encourages individuals to read the Bridgeton Landfill Health Consultation document, make written comments, and participate in the public meeting. DHSS released the health consultation for public comment on Sept. 21. Because of the postponement and rescheduling of the public meeting, the comment period has been extended through Friday, Jan. 18, 2019. The document may be viewed at health.mo.gov/bridgeton or at the St. Louis Public Library, Bridgeton Trails Branch, 3455 McKelvey Rd, Bridgeton, MO. Written public comments may be sent by email to BridgetonComments@health.mo.gov or postal mail to Lorena Locke, Bureau of Environmental Epidemiology, Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, P.O. Box 570, Jefferson City, MO, 65102. Comments need to be submitted or postmarked by Jan. 18, 2019.

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook or Twitter @HealthyLivingMO.

 

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Thu, 20 Dec 2018 21:16:24 CST
<![CDATA[ UPDATED: DHSS Provides Update on Possible Area of Public Health Concern]]>JEFFERSON CITY - In consultation with experts at the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) is advising recent, current, and possible future guests of a potential health concern for individuals that may have been in contact with a water source within the St. Louis Marriott West hotel. The facility is located at 660 Maryville Centre Drive, St. Louis, MO 63141.

 

 

As previously announced, DHSS has determined that two unassociated individuals were diagnosed in October and November with Legionnaires’ disease, who also stayed at the St. Louis Marriott West during the same time period. We do not know whether the hotel was the source of the germs that caused the two people to become sick. People can get Legionnaires’ disease, a serious type of pneumonia, by breathing in small water droplets containing Legionella germs. In general, people do not spread Legionnaires’ disease to other people.

 

In response to this information, DHSS, with the cooperation of St. Louis Marriott West management, is conducting an ongoing investigation. While culture results, which take time to grow, are pending, preliminary nonculture tests are positive in water used for drinking and showers and in the cooling tower. The investigation is ongoing and DHSS will have more guidance once culture results are obtained.

 

DHSS is actively working to help prevent additional people from becoming sick. Risk to those that were in contact with water at the facility during the previous 14 days may be greater if you are 50 years or older, smoke cigarettes, or have certain medical conditions, such as a weakened immune system.

 

If you develop symptoms of pneumonia within two weeks of staying at St. Louis Marriott West, seek medical attention right away. Pneumonia symptoms typically include cough, shortness of breath, fever, muscle aches, and headaches. Additional symptoms may be present, such as headache, confusion, nausea, or diarrhea. Ask your doctor to test you with both a urine test and a respiratory culture. If you test positive, ask your doctor to report your illness to your local or state health department as soon as possible after your diagnosis.

 

DHSS will continue working with St. Louis Marriott West, which is taking proactive measures to minimize risk and develop a water management plan to ensure protection of the health of guests and employees. Additional information on Legionella is available from the CDC website at: https://www.cdc.gov/legionella/index.html.

 

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook or Twitter @HealthyLivingMO.

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Thu, 20 Dec 2018 04:29:53 CST
<![CDATA[ UPDATED: DHSS Provides Update on Possible Area of Public Health Concern]]>JEFFERSON CITY - In consultation with experts at the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) is advising recent, current, and possible future guests of a potential health concern for individuals that may have been in contact with a water source within the St. Louis Marriott West hotel. The facility is located at 660 Maryville Centre Drive, St. Louis, MO 63141.

As previously announced, DHSS has determined that two unassociated individuals were diagnosed in October and November with Legionnaires' disease, who also stayed at the St. Louis Marriott West during the same time period. We do not know whether the hotel was the source of the germs that caused the two people to become sick. People can get Legionnaires' disease, a serious type of pneumonia, by breathing in small water droplets containing Legionella germs. In general, people do not spread Legionnaires' disease to other people.

In response to this information, DHSS, with the cooperation of St. Louis Marriott West management, is conducting an ongoing investigation. While culture results, which take time to grow, are pending, preliminary nonculture tests are positive in water used for drinking and showers and in the cooling tower. The investigation is ongoing and DHSS will have more guidance once culture results are obtained.

DHSS is actively working to help prevent additional people from becoming sick. Risk to those that were in contact with water at the facility during the previous 14 days may be greater if you are 50 years or older, smoke cigarettes, or have certain medical conditions, such as a weakened immune system.

If you develop symptoms of pneumonia within two weeks of staying at St. Louis Marriott West, seek medical attention right away. Pneumonia symptoms typically include cough, shortness of breath, fever, muscle aches, and headaches. Additional symptoms may be present, such as headache, confusion, nausea, or diarrhea. Ask your doctor to test you with both a urine test and a respiratory culture. If you test positive, ask your doctor to report your illness to your local or state health department as soon as possible after your diagnosis.

DHSS will continue working with St. Louis Marriott West, which is taking proactive measures to minimize risk and develop a water management plan to ensure protection of the health of guests and employees. Additional information on Legionella is available from the CDC website at: https://www.cdc.gov/legionella/index.html.

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook or Twitter @HealthyLivingMO.

 

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Wed, 19 Dec 2018 04:30:54 CST
<![CDATA[ UPDATED: DHSS Provides Update on Possible Area of Public Health Concern]]>JEFFERSON CITY - In consultation with experts at the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) is advising recent, current, and possible future guests of a potential health concern for individuals that may have been in contact with a water source within the St. Louis Marriott West hotel. The facility is located at 660 Maryville Centre Drive, St. Louis, MO 63141.

As previously announced, DHSS has determined that two unassociated individuals were diagnosed in October and November with Legionnaires' disease, who also stayed at the St. Louis Marriott West during the same time period. We do not know whether the hotel was the source of the germs that caused the two people to become sick. People can get Legionnaires' disease, a serious type of pneumonia, by breathing in small water droplets containing Legionella germs. In general, people do not spread Legionnaires' disease to other people.

In response to this information, DHSS, with the cooperation of St. Louis Marriott West management, is conducting an ongoing investigation. While culture results, which take time to grow, are pending, preliminary nonculture tests are positive in water used for drinking and showers and in the cooling tower. The investigation is ongoing and DHSS will have more guidance once culture results are obtained.

DHSS is actively working to help prevent additional people from becoming sick. Risk to those that were in contact with water at the facility during the previous 14 days may be greater if you are 50 years or older, smoke cigarettes, or have certain medical conditions, such as a weakened immune system.

If you develop symptoms of pneumonia within two weeks of staying at St. Louis Marriott West, seek medical attention right away. Pneumonia symptoms typically include cough, shortness of breath, fever, muscle aches, and headaches. Additional symptoms may be present, such as headache, confusion, nausea, or diarrhea. Ask your doctor to test you with both a urine test and a respiratory culture. If you test positive, ask your doctor to report your illness to your local or state health department as soon as possible after your diagnosis.

DHSS will continue working with St. Louis Marriott West, which is taking proactive measures to minimize risk and develop a water management plan to ensure protection of the health of guests and employees. Additional information on Legionella is available from the CDC website at: https://www.cdc.gov/legionella/index.html.

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook or Twitter @HealthyLivingMO.

 

 

 

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Thu, 20 Dec 2018 04:10:14 CST
<![CDATA[ Missouri improves in America's Health Rankings for 2018]]>JEFFERSON CITY, MO - The United Health Foundation released their annual America's Health Rankings yesterday, and Missouri improved from 40th to 38th. The 2018 ranking is a part of the 29th annual report, and this annual assessment factors in 4 determinants of health categories, as well as health outcomes. The four determinants are: Behaviors, Community and Environment, Policy and Clinical care.

"The increase in Missouri's health ranking is a testament to the work of many partners throughout Missouri," said Dr. Randall Williams, Department of Health and Senior Services Director. "While this is a good step forward, there is still work to be done. We are excited to work with Governor Parson and many of our other partners throughout the state to build upon the work and conversations started during healthcare week earlier this month."

Major factors in Missouri's ranking includes moving from 37th to 19th for percentage of adults with diabetes per 100,000 population and being ranked 21st in the number of children aged 19 to 35 months immunized.

Overall national trends which are concerning are the increase in drug deaths and premature deaths throughout the United States.  Concerning for Missouri are the 48th rank for adolescents receiving immunizations and the 40th rank for percent of adults who smoke.

"We know prevention messaging can make a difference, since this year we have given 100,000 more flu shots than we had by this time last year in part due to a campaign launched in collaboration with the Governor and First Lady," said Williams. "I believe this campaign is saving lives."

About the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services: The department seeks to be the leader in protecting health and keeping people safe. More information about DHSS can be found at health.mo.gov or find us on Facebook and Twitter @HealthyLivingMo.

 

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Wed, 19 Dec 2018 22:47:06 CST