New Provider Requests: Because the supply of all COVID-19 therapeutics is extremely limited, and Missouri only receives a fraction of what is being requested by providers, DHSS is temporarily suspending applications for new provider sites. We will provide additional updates once medications become more available.

Existing provider sites may continue to request monoclonal antibodies and oral antivirals through the
DHSS portal.

Treatment Guidelines: The National Institutes of Health has provided information on patient prioritization for monoclonal antibody treatment and antiviral drug interactions at this link.

 

Monoclonal Antibody Treatment (Symptomatic)

If you test positive for COVID-19 and would like to receive a monoclonal antibody (mAb) infusion, please discuss a medical evaluation and/or referral with your healthcare provider. The list below is intended as a resource for those providers to find treatments for their patients.

What is a monoclonal antibody?
Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) are laboratory-made proteins that mimic the immune system’s ability to fight off harmful antigens such as viruses. mAb s directly neutralize the COVID-19 virus and are intended to prevent progression of disease. The mAbs are most effective when given early in infection. mAbs are administered in an outpatient setting.

Who is eligible to receive a mAb infusion?
1) Individuals who have tested positive for COVID-19. mAb infusion should be administered within 10 days of symptom onset or positive COVID-19 test, whichever came first.
2) Vulnerable individuals over the age of 12 who have had a significant exposure to COVID-19, but may not yet test positive themselves.

Where can I receive a mAb infusion?
The map on this webpage provides locations of current providers. Some providers are only providing mAb infusions to their own patients, so be sure to ask your healthcare provider, local hospital or local community health clinic. [1-7-22: HHS has created a site finder tool HERE. It does not yet include mAb infusion sites. DHSS will continue to provide a map of infusion site locations until HHS is able to include those on their site.]

What is the cost of a mAb infusion?
At this time, the federal government is providing the mAb medications at no cost to all providers nationwide. Please inquire with the infusion site for any administrative costs that may apply and with your insurance company for coverage information.

Are mAb infusions appropriate for individuals at high risk?
Individuals at high risk are eligible and may benefit from mAb infusions. Examples of high-risk categories include, but are not limited to: obesity or being overweight; pregnancy; chronic kidney disease; diabetes; immunosuppressive disease or immunosuppressive treatment; cardiovascular disease; sickle cell disease, neurodevelopmental disorders; or having medical related technological dependence.

How are monoclonal antibodies administered?
Monoclonal antibodies are administered by a healthcare professional via an intravenous infusion typically, although they may be administered subcutaneously also. The process takes approximately 30 minutes for the infusion. When making an appointment however, allow up to three hours for the full visit to allow monitoring time following your infusion.

Additional Resources:

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis with Long-Acting Monoclonal Antibodies (Preventive)

Effective December 9, 2021, The Food & Drug Administration (FDA) issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for a pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) long-acting monoclonal antibodies for eligible patients. Please discuss a medical evaluation and/or referral with your healthcare provider. The list below is intended as a resource for those providers to find treatments for their patients, as well as for interested patients to identify potential providers.

Who is eligible to receive a pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) monoclonal antibody treatment?
Individuals who are not currently infected with SARS-CoV-2 and who have not had a known recent exposure to an individual infected with SARSCoV-2 AND

  • Who have moderate to severe immune compromise due to a medical condition or receipt of immunosuppressive medications or treatments and may not mount an adequate immune response to COVID-19 vaccination or,
  • For whom vaccination with any available COVID-19 vaccine, according to the approved or authorized schedule, is not recommended due to a history of severe adverse reaction (e.g., severe allergic reaction) to a COVID-19 vaccine(s) and/or COVID-19 vaccine component(s).

Where can I receive a PrEP treatment?
The map on this webpage. Please note the supply of this antiviral is extremely limited, and it is anticipated the demand will be greater than the supply for the foreseeable future.

What is the cost of the PrEP treatment?
At this time, the federal government is providing the PrEP medications to providers nationwide at no cost to the patient. Please inquire with the provider for any administrative costs that may apply and with your insurance company for coverage information.

How is the PrEP treatment administered?
The PrEP treatment is administered by a healthcare professional via an intramuscular injection.

Additional Resources:

Oral Antivirals

Effective December 22, 2021, The Food & Drug Administration (FDA) issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for Paxlovid, an oral antiviral for treatment of COVID-19 for eligible patients. The list below is intended as a resource for those providers to find treatments for their patients, as well as for interested patients to identify potential providers.

Who is eligible to receive an oral antiviral for COVID-19 treatment?
PAXLOVID may only be used by healthcare providers to treat mild-to-moderate COVID-19 in adults and pediatric patients (12 years of age and older weighing at least 40 kg) with positive results of direct SARS-CoV-2 viral testing, and who are at high risk for progression to severe COVID-19, including hospitalization or death.

Limitations on Authorized Use:

  • PAXLOVID is not authorized for initiation of treatment in patients requiring hospitalization due to severe or critical COVID-19.6
  • PAXLOVID is not authorized for use as pre-exposure or as post-exposure prophylaxis for prevention of COVID-19.
  • PAXLOVID is not authorized for use for longer than 5 consecutive days.
  • PAXLOVID may only be prescribed for an individual patient by physicians, advanced practice registered nurses, and physician assistants that are licensed or authorized under state law to prescribe drugs in the therapeutic class to which PAXLOVID belongs (i.e., anti-infectives).

Where can I receive an oral antiviral?
The map on this webpage provides locations of current providers. Please note the supply of this antiviral is extremely limited, and it is anticipated the demand will be greater than the supply for the foreseeable future.

What is the cost of oral antiviral?
At this time, the federal government is providing the new drug to providers nationwide at no cost to the patient. Please inquire with the provider for any administrative costs that may apply and with your insurance company for coverage information.

How is the oral antiviral administered?
Paxlovid requires a prescription for use. Paxlovid is administered as three tablets taken together orally twice daily for five days, for a total of 30 tablets. Paxlovid is not authorized for use for longer than five consecutive days.

Additional Resources:
Frequently Asked Questions on the Emergency Use Authorization of Paxlovid

COVID-19 Therapeutics Locator

HHS has developed a tool to locate COVID-19 therapeutics HERE. The site covers locations with the monoclonal antibody treatment Evusheld (Astra Zeneca), oral antiviral therapies Paxlovid (Pfizer), and molnupiravir (Merck). The plan is to incorporate the rest of the products in the coming weeks. Until mAb infusion therapeutics are added DHSS will continue to provide a map for those locations HERE.