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National Rural Grocery Summit

May 24, 2018

June 25-26, 2018
Manhattan, KS – Hilton Garden Inn
Register Now

Overview

Millions of rural residents now face limited choice and low quality in their retail food options. Significant research indicates a strong relationship between lack of access to healthy food and chronic, diet-related disease. Obesity, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, and coronary heart disease are all associated with a lack of access to healthy foods.

An important source of healthy rural food access is the local grocery store. They are a vital source for nutrition and health, providing a supply of fresh fruits and vegetables, dairy and protein. In fact, the presence of grocery stores in rural areas has been shown to correlate with lower rates of obesity and nutrition-related disease. Unfortunately, these rural businesses struggle and it seems every day we hear about another store closing shop and shutting their doors.

Because the loss of a rural grocery store threatens the health of local citizens and the very existence of that community, Kansas State University and a broad range of partners are working to assist rural communities and their grocery stores. Toward that goal, we are proud to announce that on June 25-26, 2018 we will host the Sixth National Rural Grocery Summit at the Hilton Garden Inn in Manhattan, Kansas. At the Sixth National Rural Grocery Summit we will bring together store owners, citizen leaders, food suppliers, academic researchers, policy makers, and funders to talk with one another about how best to sustain this critical piece of community infrastructure and improve the health of our rural citizens.

Objectives

  • To provide the latest and best thinking about rural grocery stores and rural community sustainability
  • To offer a discussion around the latest models for providing healthy food access to rural communities
  • To provide a discussion regarding rural grocery best business practices
  • To provide rural grocery store owners and rural grocery stakeholders the opportunity to network and dialogue with one another about the significant issues and challenges they face
  • To chart a path forward for rural healthy food access

Save the Date! Workforce Grand Rounds Webinar Series:Building Health Equity: The Link Between Social Determinants, Healthy Communities, and Workforce Training

May 22, 2018

3RNet
2018 Annual conference
Philadelphia, PA
September 11-13, 2018
https://conference.3RNet.org

Announcements from the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy

May 10, 2018

What’s New

CMS Announces Rural Health Strategy.  On Tuesday, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced the agency’s first strategy aimed directly at rural populations, with five objectives for health equity.  Among these, empowering patients to make decisions about their health care is one that CMS has endorsed for all beneficiaries.  But others, such as advancing telehealth and viewing CMS policy through a rural lens, acknowledge a more significant challenge specific to rural areas.

Funding Opportunities

Community Building for Rural and Native Americans, Letters of Interest – May 29.  Rural community development corporations and Tribal housing authorities are among those eligible to apply for funding from Enterprise Community Partners, a national nonprofit for affordable housing.  The application is a two-step process: Letters of Interest (LOI) must be submitted by May 29 and will be evaluated to select applicants who may submit a full proposal due on August 6. For more information, register to attend the Rural and Native American LOI Webinar – Thursday, May 10 (TODAY) at 2:00 pm ET.

DOJ Funding for Drug Courts – June 5.  The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) will make approximately 40 grants with an award ceiling of $2 million to develop and improve adult drug courts with evidence-based treatment for substance use disorder and other practices proven to reduce obstacles to recovery. Eligible applicants include city, county and state governments, and Native American tribal governments.  Opioid Use Disorder has had a proportionally larger impact on rural areas, but abuse of alcohol and other substances has also contributed to low education attainment, poverty and high risk behaviors.

NURSE Corps Scholarship Program – June 14. Students enrolled – or accepted for enrollment – in a professional degree program at an accredited school of nursing in the U.S. are eligible to apply for tuition, related costs and a monthly stipend in exchange for work at a facility in rural and medically-underserved areas upon graduation.

Director Training for Rural Residency Programs – June 15.  The National Institute for Program Director Development (NIPDD) helps physician faculty and directors of rural residency programs. This funding from the Rural Training Track (RTT) Collaborative provides full scholarship for the $5,500 tuition fee.  Those accepted for an NIPDD fellowship will engage with and learn from seasoned program directors, family medicine educators and other family medicine leaders about effective rural residency training.

Tribal Behavioral Health Grant Program – June 22. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will award up to 30 grants to fund promising community-based approaches that reduce suicide and substance use, address trauma, and promote the mental health and resiliency of American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. AI/AN tribes, tribal organizations, and consortia of tribes and tribal organizations are eligible to apply for this five-year grant program.

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2018 NURSE Corps Scholarship Program

May 5, 2018

Accepting applications through Thursday, June 14, 7:30 p.m. ET

Apply Here!

Apply today for the 2018 NURSE CORPS Scholarship Program!

The NURSE Corps Scholarship Program awards funds to students enrolled in a diploma, associate, baccalaureate, or graduate degree nursing program in exchange for their commitment to serve in high-need, underserved communities. Scholarship support includes payment of tuition, required fees, other reasonable educational costs, and a monthly living stipend.

After completion of graduation/training, recipients can fulfill their service commitment at a number of approved health care facilities currently experiencing a critical shortage of nurses. Each scholar serves for a minimum of two years and receives one year of financial support (up to four years) for each additional year of service.

All awards are subject to federal taxes. Learn more on how the NURSE Corps SP award is taxed by visiting our FAQs or watching our helpful NURSE Corps SP tax withholding webinar

Before you Apply

Before you apply, read the annually updated Application and Program Guidance. Make sure you understand the terms and conditions of the NURSE Corps contract, which outlines the requirement for fulfilling your minimum two years of service at an eligible Critical Shortage Facility.

Eligibility

To be eligible for a scholarship, all applicants must:

  1. Be a U.S. citizen (born or naturalized), a national, or a lawful permanent resident;
  2. Be enrolled—or accepted for enrollment—in a professional nursing degree program at an accredited school of nursing in the U.S.;
  3. begin classes no later than September 30, 2018;
  4. Be free from any federal judgment liens;
  5. Be free from any other existing service commitment;
  6. Not be overdue on a federal debt.

Application Help

Learn more about the NURSE Corps Scholarship Program and application process.

Join one of our NURSE Corps Scholarship Application Technical Assistance Calls:

  1. Thursday, May 17, 3-4:30 p.m. ET
    Dial-in: 1-888-790-1720
    Passcode: 5823271
  2. Thursday, May 31, 3-4:30 p.m. ET
    Dial-in: 1-888-790-1720
    Passcode: 5823271

Announcements from the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy

May 3, 2018

Funding Opportunities

Wellness and Resilience for AI/AN Children – June 4.  Education agencies serving children in federally-recognized American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribes, tribal organizations, and consortia of tribes or tribal organizations are eligible to apply for 2018 funding for Advancing Wellness and Resilience in Education (Project AWARE).  This five-year program is meant to increase awareness of mental health issues among school-aged youth, provide training for school personnel and other adults to detect and respond to mental health issues, and to connect school-aged children and their families to mental health services.

State Initiative for Child Abuse and Neglect – June 18.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will make five awards of up to $311,000 to state governments for multisector partnerships to reduce child abuse and neglect and to develop evidence-based approaches that can be replicated.  At its meeting in April, the National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services examined Adverse Childhood Experiences which, research has shown, can lead to poor health and social outcomes – chronic disease, substance abuse, unemployment and poverty.

Preventing Rural Teen Pregnancy – June 29.  The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Adolescent Health announced two funding opportunities to address teen pregnancy.  Teen birth rates have declined across the country but remain higher in rural counties than in urban or suburban areas, regardless of race or ethnicity.  One grant (AH-TP1-18-001) will provide up to $500,000 annually for two years to scale up programs support the protective factors shown to prevent risky behaviors, including teen pregnancy.  The other grant (AH-TP2-18-001) will provide up to $375,000 annually for two years to develop and test new and innovative strategies to prevent teen pregnancy.  For both opportunities, letters of intent are due May 21 and applications are due June 29.  Interested rural health providers can find more information on relevant teen pregnancy prevention efforts from HHS, CDC, and RHIHub.

Invest in Rural Transportation – July 19.  The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) will provide no less than $450 million to state, local, and tribal governments for projects to improve transportation infrastructure in rural communities in the Better Utilizing Investments to Leverage Development (BUILD) program.  DOT funded 27 rural projects in 2017, such as the complete streets improvements in Collier County, Florida, and pedestrian pathways in Gallatin County, Montana.  For 2018, DOT will consider the extent to which proposed projects increase individuals’ transportation choices and improve residents’ connections to jobs, health care, and other essential services, particularly for rural communities.  Consider contributing to BUILD projects by helping eligible applicants describe how better transportation choices in rural communities can improve health and quality of life.

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Opioid Crisis Management Training | October 2, 2018 Columbia, MO

May 2, 2018

What is the Opioid Crisis Management Training?
The Missouri Department of Mental Health, in partnership with the University of Missouri, St. Louis – Missouri Institute for Mental Health (MIMH) and the Missouri Coalition for Community Behavioral Healthcare, is providing a free half-day training on managing the opioid crisis and the Medication First model in the state of Missouri as part of Missouri’s State Targeted Response to the Opioid Crisis (Opioid STR) grant (www.missouriopioidstr.org).

When and where is the next training?
Tuesday, October 2, 2018, 1pm – 5pm
Holiday Inn Executive Center
Picadilly Room
2200 Interstate 70 Dr. SW
Columbia, MO 65203

Who should attend?
Staff from those DMH-contracted agencies who intend to deliver Opioid Use Disorder services under the Opioid STR grant, as well providers and partners in other sectors looking to improve their standard of care for Opioid Use Disorder.

Physicians, Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants, Nurses, Administrators, Peers, Community Support Specialists, Family Support Providers, Counselors, and any other professional involved in substance use treatment teams and programming are encouraged to attend.

The focus of the trainings will be on the Medical, Psychosocial, and Administrative aspects of implementing evidence-based opioid treatment programs. Each event will include brief presentations, followed by topic-specific breakout sessions and group dialogue about barriers and solutions.

How do I register?
Register here: https://katiehorst.wufoo.com/forms/m1wqeb3f0eivrsn/

Opioid Crisis Management Training | June 26, 2018 KC, MO

May 2, 2018

The next Opioid Crisis Management Training will be held in Kansas City, Missouri. Please register at the link below, and please send this to colleagues who you think would be interested:

What is the Opioid Crisis Management Training?
The Missouri Department of Mental Health, in partnership with the University of Missouri, St. Louis – Missouri Institute for Mental Health (MIMH) and the Missouri Coalition for Community Behavioral Healthcare, is providing a free half-day training on managing the opioid crisis and the Medication First model in the state of Missouri as part of Missouri’s State Targeted Response to the Opioid Crisis (Opioid STR) grant (www.missouriopioidstr.org).

When and where is the next training?
Tuesday, June 26, 2018, 1pm – 5pm
The Aladdin Holiday Inn Hotel
Roof Garden Ballroom 16th Floor
1215 Wyandotte Street
Kansas City, MO 64105  

Who should attend?
Staff from those DMH-contracted agencies who intend to deliver Opioid Use Disorder services under the Opioid STR grant, as well providers and partners in other sectors looking to improve their standard of care for Opioid Use Disorder.

Physicians, Nurse Practitioners, Physician Assistants, Nurses, Administrators, Peers, Community Support Specialists, Family Support Providers, Counselors, and any other professional involved in substance use treatment teams and programming are encouraged to attend.

The focus of the trainings will be on the Medical, Psychosocial, and Administrative aspects of implementing evidence-based opioid treatment programs. Each event will include brief presentations, followed by topic-specific breakout sessions and group dialogue about barriers and solutions. 

How do I register?
Register here: https://katiehorst.wufoo.com/forms/mfumvbb0m3phgd/

6th Annual Rheumatology Symposium

May 1, 2018

View information on the symposium.

Rural Health Clinic Educational Sessions

May 1, 2018

River City Hotel & Casino, St Louis, MO

Featuring Rural Health Clinic Sessions
Managed Medicaid Payors from IL & MO will be present

May 18, 2018
8 am – 12:30 pm
$89 (Fri) before 4/30/18, $99 (Fri) after

Friday, May 18, will feature Kurt Mosley discussing the rise of convenient care, retail clinics, health apps an robotics.

The day will also feature dedicated Rural Health Clinic sessions, physician integration and commingling space issues. Managed Medicaid payors from Illinois and Missouri will be present, too, to participate in roundtable discussions on RHC billing.

Click here for more details on conference
Register now before rates increase!

Announcements from the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy

April 19, 2018

What’s New

Experts Meet to Discuss Rural Health.  The National Advisory Committee on Rural Health & Human Services convenes this week for its first meeting of 2018.  This panel of experts from both public and private sectors will conduct site visits and hold discussions on two subjects: the challenges to rural health insurance markets and the impact of adverse childhood experiences.  Policy briefs, with recommendations to the Secretary of Health & Human Services, typically come out about three months after each meeting.  See the events section below for a webinar discussion of the committee’s December 2017 brief on suicide in rural America.

Medicaid Spending on Overdose Treatment.  Policy researchers at the Urban Institute looked at state-by-state Medicaid spending on prescription drugs for opioid use disorder.  They found that the average annual spending increase on these drugs between 2011 and 2016 was 19 percent.  Most was spent on buprenorphine, a drug that reduces cravings, for which spending increased 98 percent in that time period.  More dramatic spending increases went to naltrexone, which blocks the effects of opioids (up 1,072 percent) and naloxone, a drug that reverses overdose effects, for which spending increased 90,205 percent in that five-year period.  The report includes spending tables for each state and comparison charts for states with the five highest drug overdose mortality rates, including the mostly rural states of West Virginia, Kentucky, and Ohio.

Burden of Disease Among US States.  New research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association examined state-level data on factors affecting health, life expectancy and mortality and found that, while overall death rates declined between 1990 and 2016, the likelihood of dying young increased in some states.  The primary risk factors for morbidity and mortality were those most common in rural areas – poor diet, smoking, high blood pressure and obesity.  One significant change was found in the metrics for disability-adjusted life years, or DALYs, defined by the World Health Organization as years of healthy life lost due to disease or disability.  The two leading causes of DALYs for 1990 and for 2016 were ischemic heart disease and lung cancer. The third leading DALY cause in 1990 was low back pain; in 2016, it was chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, something that’s more common in states with large rural areas.

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MO Mid-West Regional Rural Health Bootcamp

March 28, 2018

View the flyer

Announcements from the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy

March 22, 2018

What’s New

2018 County Health Rankings.  The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute released their annual report on the place-based factors influencing health outcomes.  Among the key findings: rural counties continue to have the highest child poverty rates, and teen birth rates are nearly twice the rate for teens in suburban counties.  RWJF will host a webinar on Tuesday, March 27 at 3:00 pm ET to discuss how these factors impact population health outcomes and evidence-based actions that can be taken.

Funding Opportunities

Grants and Loans for Renewable Energy in Rural America – April 30.  Agriculture producers and rural small businesses are eligible to apply for grants and guaranteed loans for renewable energy systems and energy efficiency upgrades.  The Rural Energy for America Program (REAP) funds may be used for systems of hydrogen, wind or solar generation, and for energy efficiency improvements to heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems, lighting, insulation and replacement doors and windows.  Note that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has its own definition of eligibility for rural development programs and that each state has a Rural Development Energy Coordinator to answer questions and assist with the application process.

Farmers Market Promotion Program – May 7.  The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) offers grants to projects that assist in the development, improvement, and expansion of domestic farmers markets, roadside stands, community‐supported agriculture (CSA) programs, agritourism activities, and other direct producer‐to‐consumer market opportunities.  Eligible applicants are public and private entities, including tribal governments, agriculture cooperatives and businesses, and economic development corporations.  For rural communities with limited grocery options, farmers markets increase access to fresh, local food.

USDA Community Connect Grants – May 14.  Public, private and non-profit entities, including Federally-recognized tribal organizations, are eligible to apply for grants funding broadband deployment in rural communities lacking existing broadband service with speed of at least 10 Mbps downstream and 1 Mbps upstream. Grant funds may be used for construction, acquisition, or leasing of facilities, spectrum, land or buildings used to deploy broadband service for all residents, businesses and community facilities within the proposed funding service area.  Matching funds of at least 15% from non-federal sources are required.

CDC Funding for Opioid Overdose Prevention Research – May 15.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will make awards of up to $750,000 each to public and/or private organizations, including tribal governments and entities to find interventions that will work to prevent opioid overdose.  The funding is intended to encourage collaboration of scientists from a spectrum of disciplines including public health, epidemiology, law enforcement, social work, economics, and criminal justice to perform research that can identify ways to prevent opioid overdose more effectively. Interventions can be strategies, programs, or policies.  Because the opioid epidemic continues to pose a high burden on rural communities and providers, a challenge exacerbated by lack of prevention and treatment resources, it is important to ensure that this research includes and will have a focus on rural communities. Click the “Related Documents” tab to see the full Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO), and note that Letters of Intent are due on Thursday, April 12.

Tribal Colleges Extension Grant Program – June 6.  The National Institute of Food and Agriculture at the U.S. Department of Agriculture will provide total funding of $4.3 million to tribal colleges designated as (mostly rural) 1994 Land Grant Institutions to enhance community-focused research, education and outreach.  Awards will be made to support one or more of the following Extension base program areas: agriculture; community resources and economic development; family development and resource management; 4-H and youth development; leadership and volunteer development; natural resources and environmental management; and nutrition, diet and health.

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Available Recruitment & Retention Training

March 20, 2018

Available Recruitment & Retention Training
May 2, 2018,  from 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
The MO Primary Care Association
3325 Emerald Lane in Jefferson City, MO
Click for Registration/Session Information

Registration is limited so enroll now.  If you have questions, contact the MO Primary Care Association at:  (573) 636-4222.

No Cost | THREE LOCATIONS | MAT Waiver Training | 2018

March 19, 2018

Available MAT Waiver Training

No-Cost Half & Half | THREE LOCATIONS

Opioid STR, in partnership with the Missouri Coalition for Community Behavioral Healthcare, is providing an 8-hour MAT Waiver Course. This course is different from the traditional 8-hour live course, as the first 4 hours will be in person and second 4 hours will be individual online work. 

Once you complete the first 4-hour live training, you will receive an email from AAAP with a link for the other 4 hours of individual work. Once that work is completed, they will send you a certificate of completion.

Note that while medical residents can take the waiver training, they will not be able to apply until they have a personal DEA number and an unrestricted medical license. 

If you obtain your buprenorphine waiver following this course, you (or your agency) are likely eligible to receive $500 reimbursement for your time. 

Scheduled Trainings (all trainings are 8:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.):

  1. May 12, 2018 | Columbia, MO | Register online now: https://katiehorst.wufoo.com/forms/z1tvvupa07j2szu/
  2. June 2, 2018 | St. Louis, MO | Register online now: https://katiehorst.wufoo.com/forms/znhsvbd1udf6xj/
  3. September 29, 2018 | Kansas City, MO | Register online now: https://katiehorst.wufoo.com/forms/z1h3ax300k39net/

NP & PA’s – this coursework will go toward your 24 hours of training. If you complete this, you can go online and finish the other 16 hours of work to get your certificate. The link below will take you directly to the registration page for the other 16 hours of training
https://e-learning.apna.org/products/medication-assisted-treatment-mat-16-hour-waiver-training

After completion of the required training:

  • Participants must submit a Notice of Intent form (NOI; link provided after training)
  • Participants must submit their certificate of completion (provided after completing the training, verifies coursework completion)
  • Once participants receive their waiver, upload to https://katiehorst.wufoo.com/forms/z1fglcxq1u8h0fg/ to receive $500 reimbursement, if applicable, and connect with clinics in Missouri in need of your services

Ongoing mentorship and support:

  • PCSS-MAT has a comprehensive library of materials with continuing education, available at no cost for healthcare providers. PCSS-MAT also has a no-cost clinical coaching/mentoring program to provide one-on-one clinical expertise for primary care providers. You can post a question to a listserv with an addiction specialist and be matched with an addiction specialist.
  • Additionally, the Missouri STR team has local buprenorphine-waivered and experienced physician and NP consultants available to meet individually or respond to queries by phone or online. Email Philip Horn (philip.horn@mimh.edu), STR Project Manager, to connect with someone.

For questions or additional information please contact:

Katie Horstman
Training & Event Manager
Missouri Coalition for Community Behavioral Healthcare
221 Metro Drive | Jefferson City, MO 65109
Phone: 573.634.4626, ext. 110
KHorstman@mocoalition.org

Grants 101 Workshop

March 16, 2018

April 24, 2018
9:00 am – 5:00 pm CST
Jesus Was Homeless – 310 Gretna Road, Branson, MO

View the Registration Flyer.