Bridgeton Landfill Air Monitoring

Follow-Up Review of Air Monitoring Data

Follow-Up Review of Air Sampling Data

Follow-Up Review of Air Monitoring Data


March 31 - April 3, 2014

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air quality monitoring data collected by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) at Bridgeton Landfill from the afternoon of March 31 to the afternoon of April 3, 2014.

DNR provides continuous monitoring data for reduced sulfur compounds (reported as hydrogen sulfide), sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at three fixed locations as well as routine, twice daily, surveillance of hydrogen sulfide, benzene, and odor levels around the entire periphery of the landfill. DHSS has reviewed both sets of data to identify potential public health concerns for short-term health effects. Generally, samples are collected near the property boundary and dispersion is expected to reduce exposure downwind of the sample locations.

Odors

DNR reported occasional light, moderate, and strong odors at various locations during this time period. DHSS continues to recommend that during periods of objectionable odor, sensitive individuals should stay indoors as much as possible, avoid outdoor exercise, and seek medical advice for any acute symptoms. Symptoms associated with exposure to strong odors include headache, nausea, and fatigue. Symptoms generally associated with strong odors typically disappear once the odors dissipate.

Hydrogen Sulfide and Other Reduced Sulfur Compounds

Hydrogen sulfide concentrations were below levels of public health concern. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured by the highly sensitive Jerome meter, which detects hydrogen sulfide specifically. Reduced sulfur compounds were periodically detected by AreaRAE monitors, but previous sampling has shown that these detections are primarily due to a reduced sulfur compound with strong odor but lower toxicity.

Sulfur Dioxide

Average sulfur dioxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern, except for one hour on March 31 at one monitoring location in a residential area southeast of the landfill. Exposure to the elevated levels of sulfur dioxide shown on that one monitor may cause respiratory irritation or other short-term symptoms, particularly in asthmatics or other sensitive individuals. Winds were from the south and southwest on March 31. This may indicate that sources other than the landfill contributed to these elevated levels, or that the readings were otherwise unreliable.

Benzene and Total VOCs

Benzene was not detected in ambient air at any of the surveillance locations around the landfill during this time period. There are no health-based screening values for total VOCs. However, total VOC data are used to identify the need for compound-specific sampling. To be proactive, DNR is performing weekly VOC compound-specific sampling in locations upwind and downwind of the landfill. The laboratory results are submitted for DHSS review of public health concerns and that analysis is regularly posted online.

Carbon Monoxide

Average carbon monoxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Radiation Rates

Gamma radiation rates continue to be indistinguishable from natural background levels and were below levels of public health concern.

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March 27 - 31, 2014

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air quality monitoring data collected by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) at Bridgeton Landfill from the afternoon of March 27 to the afternoon of March 31, 2014.

DNR provides continuous monitoring data for reduced sulfur compounds (reported as hydrogen sulfide), sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at three fixed locations as well as routine, twice daily, surveillance of hydrogen sulfide, benzene, and odor levels around the entire periphery of the landfill. DHSS has reviewed both sets of data to identify potential public health concerns for short-term health effects. Generally, samples are collected near the property boundary and dispersion is expected to reduce exposure downwind of the sample locations.

Odors

DNR reported occasional light, moderate, and strong odors at various locations during this time period. DHSS continues to recommend that during periods of objectionable odor, sensitive individuals should stay indoors as much as possible, avoid outdoor exercise, and seek medical advice for any acute symptoms. Symptoms associated with exposure to strong odors include headache, nausea, and fatigue. Symptoms generally associated with strong odors typically disappear once the odors dissipate.

Hydrogen Sulfide and Other Reduced Sulfur Compounds

Hydrogen sulfide concentrations were below levels of public health concern. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured by the highly sensitive Jerome meter, which detects hydrogen sulfide specifically. Reduced sulfur compounds were periodically detected by AreaRAE monitors, but previous sampling has shown that these detections are primarily due to a reduced sulfur compound with strong odor but lower toxicity.

Sulfur Dioxide

Average sulfur dioxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Benzene and Total VOCs

Benzene was not detected in ambient air, except for on one occasion during routine surveillance at a location northeast of the landfill. However, DNR and DHSS question the validity of this lone reading. The reading was obtained following routine maintenance of the benzene detector and it appears the unit was not provided enough time to regain accuracy before obtaining the reading. At the next adjacent monitoring location only a few minutes later the detector had regained accuracy and benzene was not detected even though odors were actually higher.

There are no health-based screening values for total VOCs. However, total VOC data are used to identify the need for compound-specific sampling. To be proactive, DNR is performing weekly VOC compound-specific sampling in locations upwind and downwind of the landfill. The laboratory results are submitted for DHSS review of public health concerns and that analysis is regularly posted online.

Carbon Monoxide

Average carbon monoxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Radiation Rates

Gamma radiation rates continue to be indistinguishable from natural background levels and were below levels of public health concern.

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March 24 - 27, 2014

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air quality monitoring data collected by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) at Bridgeton Landfill from the afternoon of March 24 to the afternoon of March 27, 2014.

DNR provides continuous monitoring data for reduced sulfur compounds (reported as hydrogen sulfide), sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at three fixed locations as well as routine, twice daily, surveillance of hydrogen sulfide, benzene, and odor levels around the entire periphery of the landfill. DHSS has reviewed both sets of data to identify potential public health concerns for short-term health effects. Generally, samples are collected near the property boundary and dispersion is expected to reduce exposure downwind of the sample locations.

Odors

DNR reported occasional light to moderate odors at various locations during this time period. DHSS continues to recommend that during periods of objectionable odor, sensitive individuals should stay indoors as much as possible, avoid outdoor exercise, and seek medical advice for any acute symptoms. Symptoms associated with exposure to strong odors include headache, nausea, and fatigue. Symptoms generally associated with strong odors typically disappear once the odors dissipate.

Hydrogen Sulfide and Other Reduced Sulfur Compounds

Hydrogen sulfide concentrations were below levels of public health concern. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured by the highly sensitive Jerome meter, which detects hydrogen sulfide specifically. Reduced sulfur compounds were periodically detected by AreaRAE monitors, but previous sampling has shown that these detections are primarily due to a reduced sulfur compound with strong odor but lower toxicity.

Sulfur Dioxide

Average sulfur dioxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Benzene and Total VOCs

Benzene was not detected in ambient air at any of the surveillance locations around the landfill during this time period. There are no health-based screening values for total VOCs. However, total VOC data are used to identify the need for compound-specific sampling. To be proactive, DNR is performing weekly VOC compound-specific sampling in locations upwind and downwind of the landfill. The laboratory results are submitted for DHSS review of public health concerns and that analysis is regularly posted online.

Carbon Monoxide

Average carbon monoxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Radiation Rates

Gamma radiation rates continue to be indistinguishable from natural background levels and were below levels of public health concern.

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March 20 - 24, 2014

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air quality monitoring data collected by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) at Bridgeton Landfill from the afternoon of March 20 to the afternoon of March 24, 2014.

DNR provides continuous monitoring data for reduced sulfur compounds (reported as hydrogen sulfide), sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at three fixed locations as well as routine, twice daily, surveillance of hydrogen sulfide, benzene, and odor levels around the entire periphery of the landfill. DHSS has reviewed both sets of data to identify potential public health concerns for short-term health effects. Generally, samples are collected near the property boundary and dispersion is expected to reduce exposure downwind of the sample locations.

Odors

DNR reported occasional light, moderate, and strong odors at various locations during this time period. DHSS continues to recommend that during periods of objectionable odor, sensitive individuals should stay indoors as much as possible, avoid outdoor exercise, and seek medical advice for any acute symptoms. Symptoms associated with exposure to strong odors include headache, nausea, and fatigue. Symptoms generally associated with strong odors typically disappear once the odors dissipate.

Hydrogen Sulfide and Other Reduced Sulfur Compounds

Hydrogen sulfide concentrations were below levels of public health concern. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured by the highly sensitive Jerome meter, which detects hydrogen sulfide specifically. Reduced sulfur compounds were periodically detected by AreaRAE monitors, but previous sampling has shown that these detections are primarily due to a reduced sulfur compound with strong odor but lower toxicity.

Sulfur Dioxide

Average sulfur dioxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Benzene and Total VOCs

Benzene was not detected in ambient air at any of the surveillance locations around the landfill during this time period. There are no health-based screening values for total VOCs. However, total VOC data are used to identify the need for compound-specific sampling. To be proactive, DNR is performing weekly VOC compound-specific sampling in locations upwind and downwind of the landfill. The laboratory results are submitted for DHSS review of public health concerns and that analysis is regularly posted online.

Carbon Monoxide

Average carbon monoxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Radiation Rates

Gamma radiation rates continue to be indistinguishable from natural background levels and were below levels of public health concern.

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March 17 - 20, 2014

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air quality monitoring data collected by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) at Bridgeton Landfill from the afternoon of March 17 to the afternoon of March 20, 2014.

DNR provides continuous monitoring data for reduced sulfur compounds (reported as hydrogen sulfide), sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at three fixed locations as well as routine, twice daily, surveillance of hydrogen sulfide, benzene, and odor levels around the entire periphery of the landfill. DHSS has reviewed both sets of data to identify potential public health concerns for short-term health effects. Generally, samples are collected near the property boundary and dispersion is expected to reduce exposure downwind of the sample locations.

Odors

DNR reported occasional light to moderate odors at various locations during this time period. DHSS continues to recommend that during periods of objectionable odor, sensitive individuals should stay indoors as much as possible, avoid outdoor exercise, and seek medical advice for any acute symptoms. Symptoms associated with exposure to strong odors include headache, nausea, and fatigue. Symptoms generally associated with strong odors typically disappear once the odors dissipate.

Hydrogen Sulfide and Other Reduced Sulfur Compounds

Hydrogen sulfide concentrations were below levels of public health concern. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured by the highly sensitive Jerome meter, which detects hydrogen sulfide specifically. Reduced sulfur compounds were periodically detected by AreaRAE monitors, but previous sampling has shown that these detections are primarily due to a reduced sulfur compound with strong odor but lower toxicity.

Sulfur Dioxide

Average sulfur dioxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Benzene and Total VOCs

Benzene was not detected in ambient air at any of the surveillance locations around the landfill during this time period. There are no health-based screening values for total VOCs. However, total VOC data are used to identify the need for compound-specific sampling. To be proactive, DNR is performing weekly VOC compound-specific sampling in locations upwind and downwind of the landfill. The laboratory results are submitted for DHSS review of public health concerns and that analysis is regularly posted online.

Carbon Monoxide

Average carbon monoxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Radiation Rates

Gamma radiation rates continue to be indistinguishable from natural background levels and were below levels of public health concern.

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March 13 - 17, 2014

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air quality monitoring data collected by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) at Bridgeton Landfill from the afternoon of March 13 to the afternoon of March 17, 2014.

DNR provides continuous monitoring data for reduced sulfur compounds (reported as hydrogen sulfide), sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at three fixed locations as well as routine, twice daily, surveillance of hydrogen sulfide, benzene, and odor levels around the entire periphery of the landfill. DHSS has reviewed both sets of data to identify potential public health concerns for short-term health effects. Generally, samples are collected near the property boundary and dispersion is expected to reduce exposure downwind of the sample locations.

Odors

DNR reported occasional light and moderate odors at various locations during this time period. DHSS continues to recommend that during periods of objectionable odor, sensitive individuals should stay indoors as much as possible, avoid outdoor exercise, and seek medical advice for any acute symptoms. Symptoms associated with exposure to strong odors include headache, nausea, and fatigue. Symptoms generally associated with strong odors typically disappear once the odors dissipate.

Hydrogen Sulfide and Other Reduced Sulfur Compounds

Hydrogen sulfide concentrations were below levels of public health concern. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured by the highly sensitive Jerome meter, which detects hydrogen sulfide specifically. Reduced sulfur compounds were periodically detected by AreaRAE monitors, but previous sampling has shown that these detections are primarily due to a reduced sulfur compound with strong odor but lower toxicity.

Sulfur Dioxide

Average sulfur dioxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern, except in one monitoring location in a residential area southeast of the landfill. Exposure to the elevated levels of sulfur dioxide shown on that one sensor may cause respiratory irritation or other short-term symptoms, particularly in asthmatics or other sensitive individuals. However, DHSS and DNR question the validity of this data for at least three primary reasons. First, the readings did not change with the wind direction, and winds were predominantly from directions other than from the landfill (northwest). Second, other monitors with similar sulfur dioxide sensors in the area did not detect sulfur dioxide or any other chemicals at levels of public health concern, even when winds were blowing from the landfill toward those monitors. Third, after the sulfur dioxide sensor on the monitor at that location was recalibrated on March 18, sulfur dioxide was no longer detected. Therefore, it appears this one sulfur dioxide sensor was malfunctioning throughout this time period, and it may have been occasionally malfunctioning going back as far as March 1, even with repeated maintenance by DNR field staff. The sensor has now been replaced and appears to be functioning properly. All other monitors equipped with sulfur dioxide sensors continued to function properly during this time period.

Benzene and Total VOCs

Benzene was not detected in ambient air at any of the surveillance locations around the landfill during this time period. There are no health-based screening values for total VOCs. However, total VOC data are used to identify the need for compound-specific sampling. To be proactive, DNR is performing weekly VOC compound-specific sampling in locations upwind and downwind of the landfill. The laboratory results are submitted for DHSS review of public health concerns and that analysis is regularly posted online.

Carbon Monoxide

Average carbon monoxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Radiation Rates

Gamma radiation rates continue to be indistinguishable from natural background levels and were below levels of public health concern.

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March 10 - 13, 2014

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air quality monitoring data collected by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) at Bridgeton Landfill from the afternoon of March 10 to the afternoon of March 13, 2014.

DNR provides continuous monitoring data for reduced sulfur compounds (reported as hydrogen sulfide), sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at three fixed locations as well as routine, twice daily, surveillance of hydrogen sulfide, benzene, and odor levels around the entire periphery of the landfill. DHSS has reviewed both sets of data to identify potential public health concerns for short-term health effects. Generally, samples are collected near the property boundary and dispersion is expected to reduce exposure downwind of the sample locations.

Odors

DNR reported occasional light and moderate odors at various locations during this time period. DHSS continues to recommend that during periods of objectionable odor, sensitive individuals should stay indoors as much as possible, avoid outdoor exercise, and seek medical advice for any acute symptoms. Symptoms associated with exposure to strong odors include headache, nausea, and fatigue. Symptoms generally associated with strong odors typically disappear once the odors dissipate.

Hydrogen Sulfide and Other Reduced Sulfur Compounds

Hydrogen sulfide concentrations were below levels of public health concern. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured by the highly sensitive Jerome meter, which detects hydrogen sulfide specifically. Reduced sulfur compounds were periodically detected by AreaRAE monitors, but previous sampling has shown that these detections are primarily due to a reduced sulfur compound with strong odor but lower toxicity.

Sulfur Dioxide

Average sulfur dioxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern, except for several hours extending from March 12 into March 13 at one monitoring location in a residential area southeast of the landfill. Exposure to the elevated levels of sulfur dioxide shown on that one monitor may cause respiratory irritation or other short-term symptoms, particularly in asthmatics or other sensitive individuals. While winds were from the direction of the landfill (northwest) on March 12, winds shifted from the south and east on March 13, but the readings did not change. This may indicate that sources other than the landfill contributed to these elevated levels, or that the readings were otherwise unreliable.

Note: For more information on the sulfur dioxide readings, see the message for March 13 – March 17, 2014.

Benzene and Total VOCs

Benzene was not detected in ambient air at any of the surveillance locations around the landfill during this time period. There are no health-based screening values for total VOCs. However, total VOC data are used to identify the need for compound-specific sampling. To be proactive, DNR is performing weekly VOC compound-specific sampling in locations upwind and downwind of the landfill. The laboratory results are submitted for DHSS review of public health concerns and that analysis is regularly posted online.

Carbon Monoxide

Average carbon monoxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Radiation Rates

Gamma radiation rates continue to be indistinguishable from natural background levels and were below levels of public health concern.

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March 6 - 10, 2014

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air quality monitoring data collected by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) at Bridgeton Landfill from the afternoon of March 6 to the afternoon of March 10, 2014.

DNR provides continuous monitoring data for reduced sulfur compounds (reported as hydrogen sulfide), sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at three fixed locations as well as routine, twice daily, surveillance of hydrogen sulfide, benzene, and odor levels around the entire periphery of the landfill. DHSS has reviewed both sets of data to identify potential public health concerns for short-term health effects. Generally, samples are collected near the property boundary and dispersion is expected to reduce exposure downwind of the sample locations.

Odors

DNR reported occasional light odors at various locations during this time period. DHSS continues to recommend that during periods of objectionable odor, sensitive individuals should stay indoors as much as possible, avoid outdoor exercise, and seek medical advice for any acute symptoms. Symptoms associated with exposure to strong odors include headache, nausea, and fatigue. Symptoms generally associated with strong odors typically disappear once the odors dissipate.

Hydrogen Sulfide and Other Reduced Sulfur Compounds

Hydrogen sulfide concentrations were below levels of public health concern. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured by the highly sensitive Jerome meter, which detects hydrogen sulfide specifically. Reduced sulfur compounds were periodically detected by AreaRAE monitors, but previous sampling has shown that these detections are primarily due to a reduced sulfur compound with strong odor but lower toxicity.

Sulfur Dioxide

Average sulfur dioxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Benzene and Total VOCs

Benzene was not detected in ambient air at any of the surveillance locations around the landfill during this time period. There are no health-based screening values for total VOCs. However, total VOC data are used to identify the need for compound-specific sampling. To be proactive, DNR is performing weekly VOC compound-specific sampling in locations upwind and downwind of the landfill. The laboratory results are submitted for DHSS review of public health concerns and that analysis is regularly posted online.

Carbon Monoxide

Average sulfur dioxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Radiation Rates

Gamma radiation rates continue to be indistinguishable from natural background levels and were below levels of public health concern.

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March 3 - 6, 2014

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air quality monitoring data collected by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) at Bridgeton Landfill from the afternoon of March 3 to the afternoon of March 6, 2014.

DNR provides continuous monitoring data for reduced sulfur compounds (reported as hydrogen sulfide), sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at three fixed locations as well as routine, twice daily, surveillance of hydrogen sulfide, benzene, and odor levels around the entire periphery of the landfill. DHSS has reviewed both sets of data to identify potential public health concerns for short-term health effects. Generally, samples are collected near the property boundary and dispersion is expected to reduce exposure downwind of the sample locations.

Odors

DNR reported occasional light odors at various locations during this time period. DHSS continues to recommend that during periods of objectionable odor, sensitive individuals should stay indoors as much as possible, avoid outdoor exercise, and seek medical advice for any acute symptoms. Symptoms associated with exposure to strong odors include headache, nausea, and fatigue. Symptoms generally associated with strong odors typically disappear once the odors dissipate.

Hydrogen Sulfide and Other Reduced Sulfur Compounds

HHydrogen sulfide concentrations were below levels of public health concern. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured by the highly sensitive Jerome meter, which detects hydrogen sulfide specifically. Reduced sulfur compounds were periodically detected by AreaRAE monitors, but previous sampling has shown that these detections are primarily due to a reduced sulfur compound with strong odor but lower toxicity.

Sulfur Dioxide

Average sulfur dioxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern, except for one hour on March 5 in one monitoring location in a residential area southeast of the landfill. Exposure to these elevated levels of sulfur dioxide may cause respiratory irritation or other short-term symptoms, particularly in asthmatics or other sensitive individuals.

Note: For more information on this sulfur dioxide reading, see the message for March 13 - March 17, 2014.

Benzene and Total VOCs

Benzene was not detected in ambient air at any of the surveillance locations around the landfill during this time period. There are no health-based screening values for total VOCs. However, total VOC data are used to identify the need for compound-specific sampling. To be proactive, DNR is performing weekly VOC compound-specific sampling in locations upwind and downwind of the landfill. The laboratory results are submitted for DHSS review of public health concerns and that analysis is regularly posted online.

Carbon Monoxide

Average carbon monoxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Radiation Rates

Gamma radiation rates continue to be indistinguishable from natural background levels and were below levels of public health concern.

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February 27 - March 3, 2014

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air quality monitoring data collected by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) at Bridgeton Landfill from the afternoon of February 27 to the afternoon of March 3, 2014.

DNR provides continuous monitoring data for reduced sulfur compounds (reported as hydrogen sulfide), sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and total volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at three fixed locations as well as routine, twice daily, surveillance of hydrogen sulfide, benzene, and odor levels around the entire periphery of the landfill. On the morning of March 3, DNR performed surveillance around the landfill using hand-held monitors, as the fixed monitor instruments were inoperable due to extreme weather conditions. DHSS has reviewed both sets of data to identify potential public health concerns for short-term health effects. Generally, samples are collected near the property boundary and dispersion is expected to reduce exposure downwind of the sample locations.

During this time period, Bridgeton Landfill notified DNR of equipment failure on a gas extraction well (GEW-30R) located on the southeast portion of the landfill. On March 1 and 2, Bridgeton Landfill worked to contain the release of landfill gases and strong odors resulting from this equipment failure. In early morning on March 2, Bridgeton Landfill reported completion of this work.

Odors

DNR reported occasional light, moderate, and strong odors at various locations during this time period. DHSS continues to recommend that during periods of objectionable odor, sensitive individuals should stay indoors as much as possible, avoid outdoor exercise, and seek medical advice for any acute symptoms. Symptoms associated with exposure to strong odors include headache, nausea, and fatigue. Symptoms generally associated with strong odors typically disappear once the odors dissipate.

Hydrogen Sulfide and Other Reduced Sulfur Compounds

Hydrogen sulfide concentrations were below levels of public health concern. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured by the highly sensitive Jerome meter, which detects hydrogen sulfide specifically. Reduced sulfur compounds were periodically detected by AreaRAE monitors, but previous sampling has shown that these detections are primarily due to a reduced sulfur compound with strong odor but lower toxicity.

Sulfur Dioxide

Average sulfur dioxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern, except for several hours on March 1 in one monitoring location in a residential area southeast of the landfill. Exposure to these elevated levels of sulfur dioxide may cause respiratory irritation or other short-term symptoms, particularly in asthmatics or other sensitive individuals.

Benzene and Total VOCs

Benzene was not detected in ambient air at any of the surveillance locations around the landfill during this time period. There are no health-based screening values for total VOCs. However, total VOC data are used to identify the need for compound-specific sampling. To be proactive, DNR is performing weekly VOC compound-specific sampling in locations upwind and downwind of the landfill. The laboratory results are submitted for DHSS review of public health concerns and that analysis is regularly posted online.

Carbon Monoxide

Average carbon monoxide concentrations were below levels of public health concern.

Radiation Rates

Gamma radiation rates continue to be indistinguishable from natural background levels and were below levels of public health concern.

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Follow-Up Review of Air Sampling Data

March 25

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air sample data collected for the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) near Bridgeton Landfill on March 25, 2014. Samples were collected at two locations upwind of the landfill and two locations downwind of the landfill for laboratory determination of concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). DHSS has reviewed this data for evaluation of potential public health concerns of short-term health effects.

VOCs

Concentrations of VOCs were well below levels of public health concern. Downwind of the landfill, 4 VOCs were detected in ambient air in concentrations that generally exceeded concentrations detected upwind of the landfill. VOC concentrations ranged from 0.26 parts per billion (ppb) to 4.5 ppb and did not exceed health-based screening levels for acute exposure.

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March 21

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air sample data collected for the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) near Bridgeton Landfill on March 21, 2014. Samples were collected at two locations upwind of the landfill and two locations downwind of the landfill for laboratory determination of concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). DHSS has reviewed this data for evaluation of potential public health concerns of short-term health effects.

VOCs

Concentrations of VOCs were well below levels of public health concern. Downwind of the landfill, 8 VOCs were detected in ambient air in concentrations that generally exceeded concentrations detected upwind of the landfill. VOC concentrations ranged from 0.21 parts per billion (ppb) to 5.8 ppb and did not exceed health-based screening levels for acute exposure.

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March 18

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air sample data collected for the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) near Bridgeton Landfill on March 18, 2014. Samples were collected at one location upwind of the landfill and one location downwind of the landfill for laboratory determination of concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). DHSS has reviewed this data for evaluation of potential public health concerns of short-term health effects.

VOCs

Concentrations of VOCs were well below levels of public health concern. Downwind of the landfill, 6 VOCs were detected in ambient air in concentrations that generally exceeded concentrations detected upwind of the landfill. VOC concentrations ranged from 0.18 parts per billion (ppb) to 4.5 ppb and did not exceed health-based screening levels for acute exposure.

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March 13

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air sample data collected for the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) near Bridgeton Landfill on March 13, 2014. Samples were collected at one location upwind of the landfill and two locations downwind of the landfill for laboratory determination of concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). DHSS has reviewed this data for evaluation of potential public health concerns of short-term health effects.

VOCs

Concentrations of VOCs were well below levels of public health concern. Downwind of the landfill, 6 VOCs were detected in ambient air in concentrations that generally exceeded concentrations detected upwind of the landfill. VOC concentrations ranged from 0.16 parts per billion (ppb) to 3.5 ppb and did not exceed health-based screening levels for acute exposure.

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March 6

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air sample data collected for the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) near Bridgeton Landfill on March 6, 2014. Samples were collected at two locations upwind of the landfill and two locations downwind of the landfill for laboratory determination of concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). DHSS has reviewed this data for evaluation of potential public health concerns of short-term health effects.

VOCs

Concentrations of VOCs were well below levels of public health concern. Downwind of the landfill, 7 VOCs were detected in ambient air in concentrations that generally exceeded concentrations detected upwind of the landfill. VOC concentrations ranged from 0.21 parts per billion (ppb) to 4.7 ppb and did not exceed health-based screening levels for acute exposure.

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March 1

The Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has reviewed air sample data collected for the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) near Bridgeton Landfill on March 1, 2014. Samples were collected at one location upwind of the landfill and three locations downwind of the landfill for laboratory determination of concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). DHSS has reviewed this data for evaluation of potential public health concerns of short-term health effects.

VOCs

Concentrations of VOCs were well below levels of public health concern. Downwind of the landfill, 10 VOCs were detected in ambient air in concentrations that generally exceeded concentrations detected upwind of the landfill. VOC concentrations ranged from 0.19 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb and did not exceed health-based screening levels for acute exposure.

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