Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services HEALTH AND SAFETY http://health.mo.gov/information/news/rss.xml Official news releases issued by the Missouri Department of Health & Senior Services. en-us <![CDATA[ Test confirms fourth Missouri traveler infected with Zika virus]]>The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services confirmed a case of Zika virus in a pregnant Missouri woman who had travelled to Nicaragua, a known area of Zika transmission. This is the fourth confirmed case of Zika virus infection reported in a Missouri resident.

Nearly 80 percent of people infected with the virus will have no symptoms. Typically, symptoms are mild and include fever, rash, joint soreness and/or redness of eyes.

International health officials are examining the connection between pregnant women contracting the virus and a birth defect called microcephaly in their newborn infants. According to the CDC, babies with microcephaly often have smaller head sizes and brains that might not have developed properly.

According to the CDC, Zika virus has the potential to be spread through a mosquito bite, through unprotected sexual contact, through blood transfusion and an infected pregnant woman can pass Zika virus to her fetus during pregnancy.

There is not currently a vaccine for Zika virus. The best prevention measure is to avoid mosquito bites in areas with ongoing transmission. There have been no reported cases of Zika virus contracted from a mosquito bite in Missouri. Ways to avoid mosquito bites while outdoors include wearing EPA-registered insect repellent with DEET, wearing pants and long sleeves, or remaining indoors in an air conditioned environment.

The CDC is recommending pregnant women avoid traveling to Zika-affected areas which include countries ranging from Mexico into the Caribbean, Central American and South America.

Since the beginning of the year, DHSS has regularly updated health care providers and the public about Zika virus in addition to coordinating the approval of Missourians for testing.

Please consult CDC resources for a listing of all areas and other information about Zika virus: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/.

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Fri, 22 Apr 2016 14:51:11 CST
<![CDATA[ Test Confirms Missouri traveler infected with Zika virus]]>The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services confirmed a case of Zika virus in a Missouri man who had travelled to Colombia, a known area of Zika transmission. This is the third confirmed case of Zika virus infection reported in a Missouri resident.

Nearly 80 percent of people infected with the virus will have no symptoms. Typically, symptoms are mild and include fever, rash, joint soreness and/or redness of eyes.

International health officials are examining the connection between pregnant women contracting the virus and a birth defect called microcephaly in their newborn infants. According to the CDC, babies with microcephaly often have smaller head sizes and brains that might not have developed properly.

According to the CDC, Zika virus has the potential to be spread through a mosquito bite, through unprotected sexual contact, through blood transfusion and an infected pregnant woman can pass Zika virus to her fetus during pregnancy.

There is not currently a vaccine for Zika virus. The best prevention measure is to avoid mosquito bites in areas with ongoing transmission. There have been no reported cases of Zika virus contracted from a mosquito bite in Missouri. Ways to avoid mosquito bites while outdoors include wearing EPA-registered insect repellent with DEET, wearing pants and long sleeves, or remaining indoors in an air conditioned environment.

The CDC is recommending pregnant women avoid traveling to Zika-affected areas which include countries ranging from Mexico into the Caribbean, Central American and South America.

Since the beginning of the year, DHSS has regularly updated health care providers and the public about Zika virus in addition to coordinating the approval of Missourians for testing by the CDC.

Please consult CDC resources for a listing of all areas and other information about Zika virus: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/

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Tue, 05 Apr 2016 11:43:00 CST
<![CDATA[ Missouri State Public Health Laboratory designated as a Zika Virus Testing Laboratory]]>The state public health laboratory will now be able to conduct Zika testing more quickly

 

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services today announced that the Missouri State Public Health Laboratory has been designated as a Zika virus testing laboratory by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The Missouri State Public Health Laboratory, located in Jefferson City, will now be able to provide testing of Zika virus samples.

"Receiving this designation will improve our responsiveness to Missourians who are in need of answers and the health care providers who are treating them," said Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services Acting Director Peter Lyskowski. "During a response to a public health concern like Zika virus, timely and accurate testing is of the utmost importance, and now our state public health laboratory can help provide that."

Prior to submitting a specimen, health care providers must contact DHSS to ensure a patient's travel history and possible symptoms meet requirements for testing. If Missourians are concerned they might have the virus after travelling to a Zika-affected area, they should contact their health care provider.

So far there have been two confirmed cases of Zika virus infection reported in a Missouri residents who travelled to other countries. Nearly 80 percent of people infected with the virus will have no symptoms. Typically, symptoms are mild and include fever, rash, joint soreness and/or redness of eyes.

There is not currently a vaccine for Zika virus. The best prevention measure is to avoid mosquito bites in areas with ongoing transmission. There have been no reported cases of Zika virus contracted from a mosquito bite in Missouri. Ways to avoid mosquito bites while outdoors include wearing EPA-registered insect repellent with DEET, wearing pants and long sleeves, or remaining indoors in an air conditioned environment.

According to the CDC, Zika virus also has the potential to be spread through unprotected sexual contact, through blood transfusion and an infected pregnant woman can pass Zika virus to her fetus during pregnancy.

The CDC is recommending pregnant women avoid traveling to Zika-affected areas which include countries ranging from Mexico into the Caribbean, Central American and South America.

 

Consult CDC resources for a listing of all areas and other information about Zika virus: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/.

 

 

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Mon, 04 Apr 2016 14:11:25 CST
<![CDATA[ CDC test confirms Missouri traveler infected with Zika virus]]>The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed a case of Zika virus in a pregnant Missouri woman who had travelled to Honduras, a known area of Zika transmission.

This is the second confirmed case of Zika virus infection reported in a Missouri resident. Nearly 80 percent of people infected with the virus will have no symptoms. Typically, symptoms are mild and include fever, rash, joint soreness and/or redness of eyes.

International health officials are examining the connection between pregnant women contracting the virus and a birth defect called microcephaly in their newborn infants. According to the CDC, babies with microcephaly often have smaller head sizes and brains that might not have developed properly.

According to the CDC, Zika virus has the potential to be spread through a mosquito bite, through unprotected sexual contact, through blood transfusion and an infected pregnant woman can pass Zika virus to her fetus during pregnancy.

There is not currently a vaccine for Zika virus. The best prevention measure is to avoid mosquito bites in areas with ongoing transmission. There have been no reported cases of Zika virus contracted from a mosquito bite in Missouri. Ways to avoid mosquito bites while outdoors include wearing EPA-registered insect repellent with DEET, wearing pants and long sleeves, or remaining indoors in an air conditioned environment.

The CDC is recommending pregnant women avoid traveling to Zika-affected areas which include countries ranging from Mexico into the Caribbean, Central American and South America.

Since the beginning of the year, DHSS has regularly updated health care providers and the public about Zika virus in addition to coordinating the approval of Missourians for testing by the CDC.

Please consult CDC resources for a listing of all areas and other information about Zika virus: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/

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Wed, 30 Mar 2016 15:49:19 CST
<![CDATA[ WIC is working to improve the health of Missouri women, infants and children]]>Public nutrition program continues positive impact

Every month, more than 130,000 Missourians participate in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, commonly known as WIC. The program provides nutrition information, breastfeeding support and nutritious foods to pregnant women, new mothers, infants and children up to five years of age.

Missouri WIC offers healthy food choices for families.  Foods that can be purchased with WIC checks target specific essential nutrients often missing from the diets of participants, such as vitamins A, C and D, iron, calcium and protein. In addition, the food package has recently been revised to offer more fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, as well as the additional choices of tofu and yogurt.

"Providing nutritious food and health information to pregnant women, as well as mothers of infants and young children, helps women make healthier choices for themselves and their families," says Susan White, Bureau Chief for the Missouri WIC program. 

WIC provides quality nutrition education; breastfeeding promotion and support; nutritious foods; and referrals to health services.

To qualify for the WIC program, participants must meet the following requirements:

  • Be a pregnant, breastfeeding or new mother; be an infant up to age one; or be a child up to age 5; and
  • Be a resident of Missouri; and
  • Have a health or nutrition need; and
  • Meet income eligibility requirements. More information about income guidelines can be obtained at www.health.mo.gov/wic.

Missourians interested in more information about WIC benefits can call TEL-LINK at 1-800-835-5465 or find their local WIC agency's location online at www.health.mo.gov/wic.

WIC is funded by the United States Department of Agriculture and administered by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. 

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

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Wed, 30 Mar 2016 09:06:31 CST
<![CDATA[ Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services Awarded National Accreditation through the Public Health Accreditation Board]]>Accredited Health Departments Demonstrate the Capacity to Serve Efficiently and Effectively

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) announced today that it has achieved national accreditation through the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB). DHSS is one of 16 state health departments that have thus far achieved accreditation through PHAB since the organization launched in 2011.

"We are pleased to be recognized for achieving national standards that foster effective and efficient government and promote continuous quality improvement in public health," said Peter Lyskowski, Acting Director of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. "The accreditation process helps ensure that the programs and services we provide are as responsive as possible to the needs of our community. With accreditation, the department is demonstrating increased accountability and credibility to the public, funders, elected officials and partner organizations with which we work."

The national accreditation program, jointly supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, sets standards against which the nation's nearly 3,000 governmental public health departments can continuously improve the quality of their services and performance. To receive accreditation, a health department must undergo a rigorous, multi-faceted, peer-reviewed assessment process to ensure it meets or exceeds a set of quality standards and measures.

"The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services joins the growing ranks of accredited health departments in a strong commitment to their public health mission," said PHAB President and CEO Kaye Bender, PhD, RN, FAAN. "The peer-review process provides valuable feedback to inform health departments of their strengths and areas for improvement, so that they can better protect and promote the health of the people they serve in their communities. Residents of a community served by a nationally accredited health department can be assured that their health department has demonstrated the capacity to protect and promote the health of that community."

Learn more about the Public Health Accreditation Board and process here: http://www.phaboard.org/

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Thu, 17 Mar 2016 14:18:34 CST
<![CDATA[ CDC test confirms Missouri traveler infected with Zika virus]]>The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed a case of Zika virus in a Missouri man who had travelled to Haiti, a known area of Zika transmission. 

This is the first confirmed case of Zika virus infection reported in a Missouri resident. Nearly 80 percent of people infected with the virus will have no symptoms. Typically, symptoms are mild and include fever, rash, joint soreness and/or redness of eyes.

International health officials are examining the connection between pregnant women contracting the virus and a birth defect called microcephaly in their newborn infants. According to the CDC, babies with microcephaly often have smaller head sizes and brains that might not have developed properly.

According to the CDC, Zika virus has the potential to be spread through a mosquito bite, through unprotected sexual contact, through blood transfusion and an infected pregnant woman can pass Zika virus to her fetus during pregnancy.

There is not currently a vaccine for Zika virus. The best prevention measure is to avoid mosquito bites in areas with ongoing transmission. There have been no reported cases of Zika virus contracted from a mosquito bite in Missouri. Ways to avoid mosquito bites while outdoors include wearing EPA-registered insect repellent with DEET, wearing pants and long sleeves, or remaining indoors in an air conditioned environment.

The CDC is recommending pregnant women avoid traveling to Zika-affected areas which include countries ranging from Mexico into the Caribbean, Central American and South America.

Please consult CDC resources for a listing of all areas and other information about Zika virus: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/

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Fri, 04 Mar 2016 16:00:49 CST
<![CDATA[ State seeking organizations to serve meals to children during summer months]]>Federally funded program helps fight childhood hunger

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services is looking for organizations throughout the state to help feed thousands of children who would otherwise go without meals during the summer months when school is not in session.

The Summer Food Service Program reimburses organizations for meals they serve to children who are at risk of not having enough to eat. The program is only one way Missouri is working to fight childhood hunger.

The summer food program provides nutritious meals to children under age 18 during the summer months when school breakfast and lunch programs are not operating.

Organizations eligible to participate in the program include schools, faith-based organizations, camps, private nonprofit agencies and local government entities. The sites are required to be located in areas where at least half of the children are eligible to receive free or reduced-price meals.

The federally funded program is administered by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. The department will accept applications March 1 through May 16 to participate in the program. Organizations interested in becoming sponsors are required to attend training. 

More information about the Summer Food Service Program is available online at www.health.mo.gov/sfsp, by telephone at 888-435-1464 (toll-free) or through RELAY MISSOURI for the Hearing and Speech Impaired at 1-800-735-2966.  Potential sponsors may also write to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Summer Food Service Program, P.O. Box 570, Jefferson City, MO 65102.

 

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Thu, 03 Mar 2016 11:17:46 CST
<![CDATA[ Good Earth Egg Company Follow Up Testing Showed no Salmonella]]>The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) recently conducted follow up testing at the Good Earth Egg Company processing facility in Bonne Terre, Mo., that was negative for Salmonella bacteria.  The facility is now able to reopen after being ordered to close on December 18th until remediation efforts and re-sampling could be completed.

The facility underwent cleaning and remediation efforts over the past weekend, and DHSS staff returned early this week to take new samples at the facility. Those samples were then tested at the Missouri State Public Health Laboratory and came back negative for Salmonella bacteria.

However, DHSS urges individuals that may have already purchased eggs from the Good Earth Egg Company to fully cook their eggs to 165 degrees, avoid cross contamination of raw eggs with ready to eat foods and wash their hands after handling eggs. Alternatively, consumers may choose to throw away any older products from Good Earth Egg Company.

Symptoms of salmonellosis (illness caused by Salmonella bacteria) include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and/or stomach cramps.  Salmonellosis usually develops within six to 72 hours after a consumer's exposure to Salmonella bacteria and generally lasts three to seven days.  Salmonella bacteria can be transmitted from person to person.  Some individuals who are infected may have no symptoms at all but may still transmit the Salmonella bacteria to others.  The spread of Salmonella from person to person may be avoided by careful hand washing with soap and water, particularly after using the restroom.

Consumers who may experience the symptoms described above should consult a health care provider and discuss the possibility of Salmonella infection, or other causes of such symptoms.  If salmonellosis is diagnosed, the local health department should be contacted to report the condition.

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Wed, 23 Dec 2015 16:31:51 CST
<![CDATA[ Salmonella Discovered at Good Earth Egg Company]]>The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) has recently conducted testing at the Good Earth Egg Company processing facility in Bonne Terre, Mo., and received sample results that indicated the presence of Salmonella bacteria at the facility.  The facility has been ordered to remain closed until remediation efforts and re-sampling of the facility occurs.

DHSS urges individuals that may consume eggs from the Good Earth Egg Company to fully cook their eggs to 165 degrees, avoid cross contamination of raw eggs with ready to eat foods and wash their hands after handling eggs. Alternatively, consumers may choose to throw away any products from Good Earth Egg Company.

Symptoms of salmonellosis (illness caused by Salmonella bacteria) include diarrhea, vomiting, fever and/or stomach cramps.  Salmonellosis usually develops within six to 72 hours after a consumer's exposure to Salmonella bacteria and generally lasts three to seven days.  Salmonella bacteria can be transmitted from person to person.  Some individuals who are infected may have no symptoms at all but may still transmit the Salmonella bacteria to others.  The spread of Salmonella from person to person may be avoided by careful hand washing with soap and water, particularly after using the restroom.

Consumers who may experience the symptoms described above should consult a health care provider and discuss the possibility of Salmonella infection, or other causes of such symptoms.  If salmonellosis is diagnosed, the local health department should be contacted to report the condition.

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Mon, 21 Dec 2015 09:08:14 CST
<![CDATA[ New Star Foods Press Release Recall of Organic Girl Baby Spinach for Cadmium]]>Limited Precautionary Recall of 5 oz organicgirl Baby Spinach Announced

For Immediate Release
Consumer Hotline:  (866) 486-4939
Information Contact: (831) 758-7810

September 10, 2015 Salinas, California - organicgirl Produce is voluntarily recalling a limited quantity of 5 oz. organicgirl Baby Spinach with a Use-by Date of September 13 and Product Code B030298-001B08S due to test results indicating the presence of trace levels of the naturally-occurring element Cadmium. The recall includes 1,290 cases distributed primarily to Western and Midwestern states. No other organicgirl Baby Spinach products or other organicgirl salads are included in the recall.

No illnesses are reported in association with this recall.

Because it is naturally-occurring in the earth's soil, trace levels of cadmium are found in many foods as well as in the water and air.  There is no minimum health tolerance for Cadmium in crops or soil in the U.S. at this time and the probability of acute health consequences from consumption of Cadmium is remote.  organicgirl Produce is coordinating closely with regulators.

This Class II recall action is being taken out of an abundance of caution due to an isolated instance in which a single package of 5 oz. organicgirl Spinach tested randomly by the California Department of Public Health demonstrated the presence of trace levels of Cadmium.  A Class II recall is one in which any health risk is perceived to be non-life-threatening with any potential health effects being temporary or reversible.

The precautionary recall is being conducted to reach retailers and consumers to notify them that according to the California Department of Public Health, the recalled product should not be consumed.  

Consumers 

Consumers are being asked to check their refrigerators for a 5 oz. package of organicgirl Baby Spinach with a Use-by Date of September 13 and Product Code of B030298-001B08S. If found, it should be discarded. organicgirl will gladly replace it.  Consumers with questions may call the organicgirl consumer hotline at 866-486-4939, Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Pacific Standard Time.

Retailers

Retailers are asked to check their inventories and store shelves to confirm that none of the recalled product is present or available for purchase. organicgirl Produce customer service representatives have already contacted retailers who received product subject to this recall. 

Distribution

The recalled product was distributed to a total of 13 states including Arizona, California, Hawaii, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas and Utah.

 

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Mon, 14 Sep 2015 11:15:07 CST
<![CDATA[ Brown Packing Recalls Veal Products Due To Possible E. Coli Contamination]]>http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/recalls-and-public-health-alerts/recall-case-archive/archive/2015/recall-104-2015-release

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Fri, 24 Jul 2015 08:10:52 CST
<![CDATA[ Osamu Corporation Voluntarily Recalls Frozen Yellow Fin Tuna Chunk Meat Due to Possible Health Risk]]>http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm455622.htm

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Wed, 22 Jul 2015 14:10:59 CST
<![CDATA[ Barrel O' Fun Snack Foods Co. Issues Allergy Alert On Undeclared Milk In Vic's Original Popcorn (1-1/8oz)]]>http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm455468.htm?source=govdelivery&utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery

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Tue, 21 Jul 2015 08:29:14 CST
<![CDATA[ Missouri to expand current newborn screening network with Sunday pickup and eight new sites]]>With additional collection sites and Sunday pickup service, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) is strengthening its newborn screening program. DHSS recently added eight more hospitals to its system of 46 hospital pickup sites throughout the state. The department also added a Sunday pickup service for all birthing hospitals that are currently receiving state courier service.

This new pick up day will be in addition to the current Monday through Friday pickup schedule.  By implementing this additional pickup day, the newborn screening samples collected over the weekend will arrive at the state lab one day earlier, helping to expedite their testing.

Prompt newborn screening sample transit times can be life-saving for newborn babies.  The Missouri State Public Health Laboratory (MSPHL) screens for several disorders which need rapid detection and intervention to prevent serious health complications.

Newborns in Missouri are screened for over 65 conditions to help ensure health problems are identified soon after birth. If a baby has a high risk result after the screening is conducted, their doctor is contacted as soon as possible.

To find out more about the newborn screening program in Missouri online go to: http://health.mo.gov/living/families/genetics/newbornscreening/index.php

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Mon, 20 Jul 2015 15:10:48 CST