Sexual Assault Prevention Intervention Strategies

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The sexual assault intervention strategies are described separately below. Each of these strategies is most effective when it is combined with other strategies. For example, changing victims’ knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs will do little to decrease sexual assaults if there are no policies for prevention or reduction of sexual assaults in organizations or communities. Similarly, health care providers who receive training to discuss sexual assault prevention with their clients or patients can help to support individual knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs.

The Sexual Assault in Different Populations section gives suggestions for how to work with different groups of individuals. For example, victims of sexual assault need different types of support and information. Different groups may think or talk about sexual assault prevention in different ways based on their values and beliefs. Intervention strategies work best when language, reading level, and cultural barriers are addressed (see Cultural Competence for more information).


Select one of the following intervention strategies The purpose of your intervention is to change…
infoHealth outcomes infoBehavior infoKnowledge, attitudes, skills, and beliefs infoSocial support infoEnvironments and policies
infoCampaigns & Promotions

I

I

C

C

C

infoIndividual Education

E

E

E

C

I

infoGroup Education

C

E

E

E

I

infoSupportive Relationships

E

I

I

E

I

infoProvider Education

E

C

C

C

I

infoEnvironment & Policies

C

C

I

I

E

E = evidence supports the effectiveness of this strategy
C = evidence supports use of this strategy in combination with other strategies
I = insufficient evidence to make a recommendation


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