Skip to content

Category Archives: Health

Announcements from the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy

December 8, 2017

What’s New

Innovating Behavioral Health in Pediatric Care.  The SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions (CIHS) promotes the integration of behavioral health services in primary care provider settings.  In January 2018, CHIS will launch an Innovation Community for Building Integration in Pediatric Care Settings to increase behavioral health capacity for children. This opportunity to receive educational resources, group and individual coaching, and learn about best practices is open to rural, suburban, and urban provider organizations including: local health department clinics with a pediatric focus, HIV provider organizations, maternal and child health providers in underserved communities, school-based health centers, federally qualified health centers, and rural health clinics. Participants will either be new to integrating behavioral health services or just beginning to integrate care (e.g., hiring a behavioral health consultant and/or introducing a mental health or substance use screen to their services array). The focus of the improvement activities will be to: 1) help each organization identify their baseline readiness to integrate services, and 2) assist them in developing and operationalizing a work plan.  Applications for the 2018 cohorts are due by close of business on Friday, December 15.  For more information, contact  Integration@thenationalcouncil.org.

Emergency Medical Services for Children.  FORHP is partnering with the Maternal and Child Health Bureau at HRSA for an intaragency initiative to improve coordination of care for children experiencing mental health crisis in rural emergency care settings.  We are currently looking across state, federal and local programs to see what existing resources can inform this work. The result will be a toolkit that can be used by first responders and emergency care providers.  Examples of what we’re seeking include policies, trainings, procedures, surveys, simulation modules, peer-reviewed journal articles, current/ past research that can help identify gaps in care, useful information, best practices etc.  If you have anything to share, please send to Yolanda Baker, ybaker@hrsa.gov, and include “Critical Crossroads” as part of the email subject.

(more…)

Announcements from the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy

What’s New

Friday is World AIDS Day.  This commemoration that takes place on the 1st of December each year comes at a turning point in the ongoing narrative of HIV/AIDS.  In September, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced that, for the first time in the four-decade history of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), individuals who take daily medication to suppress the virus have effectively no risk of sexually transmitting to an HIV-negative partner.   Advocates believe this will bring a change in the perception of what it means to be HIV-positive and reduce barriers to getting tested and treated.  Early stage HIV can be asymptomatic, and about 40% of new HIV infections come from people who don’t know they have HIV, including heterosexual men and women at increased risk and people who inject drugs.  In rural areas, persons living with HIV/AIDS face additional barriers that limit access to testing, treatment and ongoing care.  Earlier this year, the CDC issued a map showing that, while the majority of HIV diagnoses in the U.S. are in urban areas, there are parts of the country where the rates are surprisingly high for suburban and rural areas.  These include the South, where 23% of new HIV diagnoses are suburban/rural, and the Midwest where 20% are urban/rural.

This week’s Funding section covers previously mentioned opportunities that are still open and may help providers with HIV/AIDS care in rural communities.

Funding Opportunities

Public Health Crisis Response – December 11.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is seeking applications from public health departments in tribal, state and local governments for cooperative agreements meant to enhance their ability to rapidly mobilize and respond to specific public health emergencies.  These emergencies may include infectious disease outbreaks, pandemics, and other public health emergencies that exceed jurisdictional capacity and resources.  Awardees would be approved but unfunded until a crisis occurs, enabling them to plan for emergency activation activities.  Eligible applicants must have an existing capacity and infrastructure to provide the CDC’s 10 essential public health services, which include a process and protocol to reach rural or isolated populations.

New Geographic Service Areas for HIV Intervention – January 2.  Current grantees and new organizations proposing services for People Living With HIV (PLWH) may apply for funding through the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Part C Early Intervention Services (EIS) Program. The purpose of the EIS program is to provide comprehensive primary health care and support services in an outpatient setting for low income, uninsured, and underserved PLWH.  Eligibility includes Rural Health Clinics and community-based organizations. Successful applicants will provide HIV testing, medical evaluation, counseling and treatment, among other services.  For more information, contact Hanna Endale at hendale@hrsa.gov.

(more…)

Rural Health Research & Policy Centers

November 29, 2017

View the Research Alert.

USDA Invests more than $1 Million to Improve Health Care in Rural Missouri

November 29, 2017

COLUMBIA, MO, November 17, 2017 – U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue today announced that USDA provided more than $1 billion in Fiscal Year 2017 to help improve access to health care services in rural communities. Of that amount, more than $1 million was invested in Missouri.

“USDA invests in a wide range of health care facilities – such as hospitals, clinics and treatment centers – to help ensure that rural residents have access to the same state-of-the art care available in urban and metropolitan areas,” Perdue said. “I understand that building a prosperous rural America begins with healthy people. Ensuring that rural communities have access to quality medical care is a top priority for USDA.”

USDA made these investments through the Community Facilities Direct Loan Program. The loans can be used to construct, expand or improve health care facilities such as hospitals, medical clinics, dental clinics and assisted-living facilities, as well as to purchase equipment. Public bodies, non-profit organizations and federally recognized tribes in rural areas and towns with up to 20,000 people are eligible for these loans.

“Access to health care is important for rural Americans. Often, health care professionals and facilities in rural areas may not be able to provide certain services as extensive as larger communities,” said Missouri State Director Jeff Case. “To ensure our rural Missourians are getting the medical care they need, we are working with hospitals, medical centers, assisted-living facilities, and emergency responders to provide more resources for individuals living in those areas.”

The following are a few examples of rural health care projects that USDA funded during FY 2017 in Missouri:

  • Livingston County received a $17,400 loan for construction of a 14-bed assisted living wing. This project is expected to increase future revenues as it will allow the facility to modernize and meet the needs and demands of the growing population of retirees in the community.
  • Crawford County received a $12,900 loan to purchase a power stretcher and equipment to assist the Steelville Ambulance District with lifting patients while responding to emergency calls.

Funding from USDA’s Community Facilities Direct Loan program is playing a major role in Kirksville, Missouri. The Adair County Nursing Home District received $1 million, in addition to prior RD funding, to construct a new nursing home facility which will replace their current 50-year-old building. The new one-story 45,000 square foot building will offer the modern concept of ‘neighborhoods’ for the residents giving a more home-like experience. The 90-bed facility will also have a unique rehab environment for inpatient and outpatient use.

USDA Rural Development provides loans and grants to help expand economic opportunities and create jobs in rural areas. This assistance supports infrastructure improvements; business development; homeownership; community services such as schools, public safety and health care; and high-speed internet access in rural areas. For more information, visit www.rd.usda.gov/mo.

Rural Health Information Hub

November 29, 2017

View the Rural Health Information Hub updates.

Rural Health Research & Policy Centers

November 28, 2017

View the Research Alert.

CMS Region 7 Update

November 29, 2017

View the update.